The Broiler: Your Kitchen’s Most Underutilized Appliance

by Michelle Rossi

Ahh, spring is in the air and grilling season is almost upon us. For those lucky enough to own or have access to a grill, grilling makes a homemade dinner seem so quick and easy! But what about those of us who don’t own a grill? And what about those chilly fall, winter, or spring months in Boston where all you want to do is stay inside and forget the crazy weather outside?

Enter: your broiler.

If you’re like most home cooks, you might only think of your broiler as a garlic bread-toaster, cheese-melter, or pizza-crisper. While you may have come across recipes that utilize the broiler as a cooking element, using this high-heat cooking style may seem intimidating. It’s okay, you’re not alone!

I consider myself an avid cook and baker, and I rarely use my broiler until recently. About a year ago, I stumbled upon a chicken recipe that required me to cook the chicken under the broiler and promised me grill-like results. Much to my surprise, my chicken cooked in less time than I thought possible. I was skeptical. I wanted to hate it so that I could prove that broiling was nothing like grilling. But I’ve fallen in love with my broiler, and now I just can’t stop.

For those of you without access to a grill, all you need for an almost-grill-worthy meal is a broiler pan.  You probably already have one, but its hiding in the forgotten drawer under your stove. Every oven comes one, yet no one seems to use it! If you don’t have a broiler pan, you can also use a rimmed baking sheet with oven-safe cookie racks, or purchase a new broiler pan here. Trust me, it is worth the investment.

Before we start, there are some things you should know about broiling:

  • Broiling uses the top heating element of your oven, cooking by radiation instead of convection (taking it back to high school physics here!). Broiling happens quickly—for any of you who have made garlic bread under the broiler, you know that it can go from delicately golden to incinerated in ten seconds. When broiling, it is a good idea to set your kitchen timer and stay in the kitchen!
  • Many oven broilers have a high and low setting—I almost always go with high. Don’t panic if yours only has one setting, just set it to broil and proceed.
  • There are debates on whether you should leave your oven cracked open when you broil. I usually do so that I can watch the broiling process (it happens fast). One source claims that electric ovens may need to be open slightly when broiling to avoid overheating; on the other hand, some gas models won’t operate with the door open. To further confuse things, The Kitchn recommends keeping the door open cracked to vent steam and to ensure cooking by radiation, not convection. Reading the comments on Food52 won’t help you much either, as it also offers varying answers. My opinion: consult your oven’s user manual if you have it. If you aren’t sure, leave the door open. If your broiler doesn’t turn on with the door open, try closing it. Whatever works!
  • Test to see how far your pan will be from the heating element before you turn on your oven. Put your cold (empty!) pan on your top rack and adjust the rack up or down until the cooking surface is 4-5 inches from the heating element (this is usually the top rack).
  • DO NOT use glass dishes under the broiler. Trust me on this one. Glass and rapid temperature changes do not mix.

Over the past few months, I have perfected a few recipes using my broiler pan.  Remember how I said the boiler cooks quickly? Well, I can have these recipes on the table in under 20 minutes. Happy broiling!

Grilled chicken broiler recipe

Photo: Author 

Almost-Grilled Chicken Thighs

This is one of my go-to recipes for a quick dinner with a vegetable, or as part of a fancy spread when friends come over. It can easily be scaled up, as the measurements do not have to be precise. Try experimenting with your own seasonings—I like adding smoked paprika, and a dash of cayenne for crispy chicken that is perfect for chopping up and putting on a pita with hummus and veggies.

Serves two for dinner, with lunch leftovers

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 lb boneless skinless chicken thighs (about 4 thighs)
  • 1 small (7oz) container full-fat plain Greek yogurt, about 1 cup (I like Fage)
  • 1 lemon, zest & juice
  • 2-3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 teaspoon ground cumin (more or less to taste)
  • Salt to taste

DIRECTIONS

  1. Combine yogurt, lemon zest and juice, minced garlic, and cumin. Season with salt, taste.
  2. Place your chicken in a large bowl or a ziplock bag and add the yogurt mix. Make sure the chicken is well coated. You can prepare the chicken up to 1 hour in advance (any longer will start to turn it mushy)
  3. Turn on your broiler to high (if there is a high/low option)
  4. Line the bottom drip-tray of your broiler pan with tinfoil for easy cleanup. Spray the slotted tray of your broiler pan with Pam or lightly coat with a high-heat oil of your choice
  5. Remove the chicken thighs from the yogurt mixture, letting excess drip off, while also keeping a good amount on the chicken (it acts as chicken “sunscreen”). Place them on your broiler pan in one layer, leaving some space in between pieces.
  6. Broil for 5-6 minutes, or until pieces of the yogurt start to char. Flip the chicken and continue broiling for another 6-7 minutes. Pay attention to which pieces are crisping quickest—you might need to rotate your pan or move the chicken pieces around a bit during the cooking process (just like grilling!)
  7. The chicken is done when it reaches 165­o on an instant-read thermometer, or you cut open the chicken and the juices run clear. Remember that chicken thigh is dark meat, and even when cooked may look slightly pinker than chicken breasts.

Serve over rice, or in a pita!

Not-Really-Fried Shrimp

This is a favorite meal from my childhood, that I recently re-discovered. Better yet—you don’t even need a broiler pan! Butterflying the shrimp can take a little bit of time, but this recipe can be made ahead up to 8 hours and kept in the refrigerator until it is cooked. I love making it for dinner guests because I can prepare it ahead of time and spend the majority of my party interacting with my guests!

Michele Evans Easy Seafood Recipes

Photo: Author

Adapted from “Michele Evans’ Easy Seafood Recipes”

Serves 4

INGREDIENTS

  •  1 ½ pound jumbo shell-off shrimp
  • 2/3 cup flour (plus a bit more, if needed)
  • 2 eggs, beaten (plus one more on hand, just in case)
  • 1 cup breadcrumbs (plus a bit more, if needed)
  • 6 tablespoons butter
  • 4 cloves garlic
  • Juice from 1 lemon

DIRECTIONS

  1. Melt the butter in the microwave or in a saucepan and add the garlic and lemon. Set aside.
  2. Butterfly the shrimp by carefully by cutting each shrimp down the back (outer curve) without going all the way through. (For a quick tutorial, check out this article)
  3. Set up a dipping station, with flour on your left, egg in the middle, breadcrumbs on your right.
  4. Dip each shrimp in the flour, the egg, then breadcrumbs, lightly shaking off the excess of each. Place each shrimp on a rimmed baking sheet. (The shrimp can be stored in the refrigerator at this point for up to 8 hours)
  5. Turn your broiler on high. Spoon the butter garlic mixture over the shrimp. Broil for 6-8 minutes, until the shrimp are brown and no longer transparent on the inside when cut open.
  6. Serve with cocktail sauce

 

Simple Broiled Fish

This is the simplest way I know how to prepare fish without giving my apartment a “stinky fish smell” because it cooks so quickly! Choose filets that are less than 1/2inch thick, and keep an eye on them as they cook. As with all broiling, it will go quickly!

Serves 4

INGREDIENTS

  • 4 fillets of your favorite fish (I like Atlantic Char, Bluefish, or NY/PA Perch for their sustainability)
  • 2-3 teaspoons olive oil
  • 2-3 cloves garlic, minced
  • Zest and juice of 1 lemon
  • Your favorite spices

DIRECTIONS

  1. Prepare your broiler pan by lining the bottom tray with tinfoil, and lightly greasing the grated tray. Preheat your broiler
  2. Mix olive oil, garlic, lemon and spices together, and lightly coat each fillet in the oil mixture.
  3. Broil 3-5 minutes, depending on thickness until fish is flaky and cooked through.

 

Michelle Rossi is a second-year dual-degree NICBC-MPH student who spends most of her precious free time cooking elaborate meals for herself and friends. She is a collector of cookbooks, and especially enjoys reading and re-reading “Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat”, “The Smitten Kitchen”, the 1975 edition of “The Joy of Cooking”, and her 15-year collection of Cooks Illustrated Magazines. When Michelle’s not in the kitchen, you can find her teaching about the natural world at Mass Audubon’s Drumlin Farm, where she strives to find the connections between nature, nutrition and public health.

Tales from the Sugar Bush: Friedman Takes a Trip to the Heart of Vermont’s Maple Kingdom

by Laura Barley

The maple syrup harvest has been a tradition in New England for centuries, and this March six Friedman students had the chance to help fellow student Hannah Kitchel’s family in their spring ritual

 

Maple tree vermont

Photo: Laura Barley

 

Hundreds of trees make up the sugar bush forest that connects the lives of a few devoted Vermont families. The small town of Danville, tucked neatly in Vermont’s Northeast Kingdom, is where second-year AFE student Hannah Kitchel grew up and where her parents continue to manage the neighboring maple stand. In a New England tradition that spans centuries and crosses cultures, the small group of families have collectively invested time and equipment to harvest syrup each spring to last them through the year.

A stand of roughly 50 trees – the sugar bush – all had metal buckets placed waist-high, secured by inch-long taps that drip sap as the weather warms. Historically, sugaring season in Vermont has started the first weekend of March, but the recent shift in warmer weather patterns has meant that sugaring season now begins a few weeks earlier, in late February.

“I remember sugar season used to start in March after [the] town meeting. They said starting in February was a mistake because there would be a long freeze which would mean re-tapping,” explains Fred Kitchel, Hannah’s father and one of the main harvesters in the group. “Now, a February start is common.”

Despite the cozy seasonal celebration that maple syrup receives each fall, the hallmark of sugaring season is this special blend of warmer days and cooler nights that signals trees to prepare for spring. The melted snow seeps into their roots, carries their stored sugars up the trunks to send life into new buds – though not before we take a piece of the magic for ourselves.

 

Maple sap freshly tapped vermont

This is what sap looks like when it first comes out of a maple tree (Photo: Laura Barley) 

 

We headed through the sugar bush armed with five-gallon buckets, excited to see what the trees had produced since the day prior, when the Kitchels last harvested. I’ve always loved imagining trees as straws, sucking water up from the earth to replenish their thirsty leaves; even though you may imagine sap to be a thick, brown, glue-like liquid, the sap that started to drip from the taps was in fact mostly water, clear and smooth. It turns out that a lot of sap is required to make syrup of any justifiable quantity. These particular sugar maples boast a 40:1 retention rate, meaning that the 19 five-gallon buckets we harvested would result in roughly 2.5 gallons of maple syrup in all.

 

aluminum labyrinth for making maple syrup

Photo: Laura Barley

 

Though the families try to share the workload as equally as possible and even manage a worklog together, the core of the operation is at Betty Lou’s (yes, wonderfully, that really happens to be her name) place just up the road. Once the buckets were loaded in the truck, we drove up to her beautiful yellow three-story farmhouse, which had a shed in the back devoted specifically for distilling the sap. What filled most of the inside was a shiny, aluminum that we first had to wash with vinegar, tilting it back and forth to ensure the utmost cleanliness.

Once we’d cleaned the labyrinth, we poured in the first bucket of sap and lit the gas burner that lay underneath. Over the course of a few hours the heat would evaporate off much of the water, leaving a slightly thicker, tanner substance. This was still not the final product – for that we had to head inside to Betty Lou’s kitchen, the laboratory of a woman devoted to the process of perfection.

 

concentrating pure maple syrup fancy

Betty Lou in the thralls of her work (Photo: Laura Barley) 

 

The kitchen was small but meticulously organized. Several burners heated pots of the sap in stages, which Betty Lou frenetically checked every few minutes for exactly the right characteristics. She whipped out what she called a hydrometer, a tool to test the specific buoyancy and density of the syrup’s sugar content, and after a few rounds of checking the hydrometer in small batches, Betty Lou was finally satisfied.

 

Filtering fancy maple syrup

A simple, cone-like apparatus filters the syrup one last time (Photo: Laura Barley)

 

Next the syrup entered one final round of filtering, designed to cleanse and thicken it. And though the process was precise, not all maple syrup is created equally. There is a set of USDA standards that outlines a gradient of maple syrup based on color, sweetness, and viscosity, which depend entirely upon the weather and the trees. Because it was still fairly cold in Danville that first week of March, the syrup we made was delightfully termed ‘Fancy’, the type of Grade A syrup that tends to arrive earliest in the season before the trees release too much sugar. Fancy, also known as ‘Delicate’ syrup denotes a lighter, sweeter syrup than the darker Grade B varieties typically found at the grocery store.

By the end of the afternoon, the kitchen was full of sweet steam and prolonged excitement – most of us had never made syrup before and had spent much of the last hour daydreaming about the buckwheat pancakes and Vermont we’d lather it on later that night. Finally, the syrup was ready to be poured into jars and sent home with us. Our bounty was a small fraction of the gift that the Kitchel family and Vermont’s sugar maples would afford this year, and to them I owe many moments of gastronomic happiness and endless thanks.

 

Pure vermont maple syrup

Some of Betty Lou’s finest products (Photo courtesy of the author)

Laura Barley is a second-year AFE student who loves to eat any food practically any time. She recently fell in love with the rich food culture that Vermont has to offer, and dreams of a time when she has her own land complete with dairy cows and maple trees.

Cricket Pancakes (CrickCakes): A New Way to Eat Your Greens

by Jessica R. Manly

A growing movement of nutritionists, sustainability researchers, activists, and alternative foodies are calling edible insects the food group of the future. In America, one of the biggest hurdles remains how to get people to take a bite. These simple blender pancakes are an easy, delicious way to dip your toe into the radical world of entomophagy.

Before coming to the Friedman School, I taught nutrition, cooking, and gardening in several public elementary schools in northwest Montana. Many of the children I worked with were absolutely thrilled to try the kale, spinach, and carrots we grew together outside their classrooms. Others, no matter how many songs we sang, or smoothies we made, or stories we read about friendly vegetables, simply would not take a single bite.

What people choose to eat (and not to eat) is deeply personal, cultural, familial, and emotional. These daily choices are sometimes governed by necessity, ease, and are often immutable. When you really pause to try, it can be difficult to unravel the complicated web of nutritional knowledge, inherited tastes, cultural reinforcement, economic constraints, and effects of globalization that compose our plates. Why do you eat cows but not whales? Why kale now, but not ten years ago? Why lobsters, but not crickets? And what would it take for you to want to chew on an entirely new class of the animal kingdom?

Eating insects, or entomophagy, has many potential nutritional and sustainability benefits when compared to meat consumption. A two-tablespoon serving of ground cricket powder provides 55 calories, 7 grams of protein, 2 grams of fat, less than one gram of carbohydrate, and a hefty dose of B vitamins (23% of the Daily Value B-2 and 17% of the Daily Value B-12). Reported sustainability benefits include lower greenhouse gas emissions when compared to ruminants, pork, and poultry, low land and water requirements, high feed conversion efficiencies, organic by-product waste reduction, and potential utility as feed for livestock and in aquaculture. A 2013 Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) assessment of insect consumption and global food and feed security reports that nearly two billion people consume over 1,900 species of insects as part of traditional diets.

So why are crickets and mealworms still such a fringy snack choice in America? As a friend said recently: “eating bugs is just gross.” In fact, many of us (the author included) were reprimanded against doing so as children. Cultural barriers remain the largest hurdle for expanding insect consumption in America, in addition to lingering questions about scaling production, the environmental impacts of cricket feed, and concerns about access and affordability.

I buy my cricket protein online because it is still relatively hard to find on shelves in Boston. A friend of mine who works for a ubiquitous natural foods grocery store says they don’t stock insect protein because they don’t yet know how to apply their animal welfare ranking system—apparently they “don’t mess around with cricket welfare.”

Another common objection is to the pungent, nutty flavor pure cricket protein powder can have. As a result, most products sold in the West attempt to mask the taste, and any evidence of actual insects, in high-flavor, processed snack foods with questionable nutritional profiles and plenty of added fats and sugars. Though I don’t personally find the taste or smell of cricket powder offensive, I understand the reluctance to consume it straight-up, especially as a novice. As we work towards culturally normalizing insect consumption in the U.S., experimenting with variations on delicious, familiar, and nutrient-dense recipes will be key. I think these easy blender pancakes are a great place to start.

CrickCakes (Photo: Jessica Manly)

CrickCakes (Photo: Jessica Manly)

CrickCakes

Serves 1

Ingredients:

1 banana

1/4 cup raw rolled oats

2 eggs

2 tablespoons cricket protein powder

1/4 cup blueberries (optional)

1/4 teaspoon cinnamon

1 teaspoon vegetable oil

Pinch of salt

Directions:

  1. Blend all ingredients except blueberries on high in blender until smooth (approximately 15 seconds).
  2. Heat a lightly oiled (butter, coconut oil, or vegetable oil of choice) griddle or frying pan over medium-high heat. Pour or scoop the batter onto the griddle, using approximately 1/4 cup for each pancake.
  3. Add blueberries if using. Flip, brown on both sides, and serve hot as is, or with maple syrup or plain yogurt and additional cinnamon.

1/2 cup cooked sweet potato or winter squash can be substituted for the banana. If you want to get really fancy, add in a few pumpkin or chia seeds with the blueberries for extra protein.

Jessica Manly is a second-year Agriculture, Food, and Environment MSc student at the Friedman School. When she is not researching food and agriculture systems with the potential to mitigate climate change, she is most likely running in the woods with her imaginary dog, or trying to get people to eat her unusual vegetable (or insect)-based recipes.

Gluten-Free or Not, You’ll Want To Try Sarah Lynn’s Desserts

by Nako Kobayashi

Gone are the days that having food restrictions means you have to resort to eating lesser versions of your favorite treats. Gluten-free dessert cookbook author Sarah Lynn develops dessert recipes that are both food restriction- friendly and delicious. The Sprout sat down with this Boston-based Instagram influencer to learn how she developed her successful food business.

Sarah Lynn Baketobefit donuts healthy dessert cookbook

Sarah Lynn, owner of BakeToBeFit, with her donuts from one of her healthy dessert eCookbooks (Photo: Instagram @sarahlynnfitness)

When someone asks what she does for a living, Sarah Lynn, a Boston-based food entrepreneur, never really knows what to say. “For most people, it’s a really short answer, but I don’t really know what I am.” That’s because Sarah singlehandedly develops and photographs recipes, writes cookbooks, maintains the blog, and runs the social media accounts for her healthy dessert cookbook company, BakeToBeFit. “I’m kind of an author, kind of an Instagram influencer, kind of a blogger, kind of a photographer,” she explains.

Sarah graduated from the University of Richmond in 2015 with a degree in Studio Art and a minor in Business. She never imagined that she would own her own gluten-free cookbook company. Having always loved cooking and baking, Sarah always dreamed about managing a food blog, but she had no idea where to start. After learning that many bloggers use Instagram to develop a following and gain exposure, she decided to start her own Instagram account during her senior year of college, with the handle @sarahlynnfitness. She began by posting daily meals, workouts, and the occasional recipe.

healthy gluten-free funfetti cake baketobefit

You don’t have to be gluten-free to want to eat this cake! (Photo: Instagram @sarahlynnfitness)

The summer after graduating from college, Sarah was diagnosed with Celiac disease. Although she was relieved to find out why she had been feeling ill, she was also devastated that she would no longer be able to consume gluten – a key component of many of the things she loved to cook. Not wanting her diagnosis to keep her from pursuing her food dreams, Sarah started experimenting with gluten-free recipes. She found that the gluten-free versions of some of her favorite baked goods were also lower in calories and more nutritious than the traditional versions. This is due to the use of some ingredients such as oatmeal and coconut flour in the place of traditional white flour.

Baketobefit recipe healthy dessert

A re-post of a photo taken by someone who tried out a #baketobefit recipe
(Photo: Instagram @baketobefit)

Sarah’s Instagram followers loved the photos of her new gluten-free recipes. The most popular were the photos of gluten-free desserts. This led her to write the first of her four eCookbooks, available for purchase online, the Healthy Cake Cookbook. Initially, Sarah didn’t intend on making her cookbook a business. It was simply a way to put all the recipes in one place for her followers. The book quickly gained popularity, however, and she soon wrote her next book, the Healthy Cookie Cookbook. @baketobefit was born when Sarah decided she wanted a second Instagram account to share photos taken by people who had tried her recipes. Around this time, a reporter from Business Insider requested to make a video about her. The exposure she gained from this video allowed Sarah to start focusing on her food business as a full-time job.

healthy chocolate dessert baketobefit

Sarah’s Instagram account will leave you drooling (Photo: Instagram @sarahlynnfitness)

Currently, @sarahlynnfitness has 148 thousand followers. Scrolling through the endless feed of desserts, it’s easy to see why. I personally can’t help but drool every time I visit Sarah’s Instagram page, and that is exactly what she says she wants. “I try to make [the desserts] look like the most indulgent things ever, but they are actually made with healthy ingredients [compared to the traditional versions].” Sarah boosts the nutrition profile of tasty desserts while also making them consumable for people with food restrictions. For Sarah, this kind of creative challenge is more fun than developing recipes for food that already looks nutritious.

Sarah is often inspired by photos of really decadent desserts. Other times, she tries to recreate “copycat” versions of her favorite childhood treats. A lot of experimentation is involved in getting the right taste and texture. “I do it by feeling, and what the dough looks like,” Sarah says. Keeping a notebook next to her while she experiments, she writes down what she added or tweaked to a recipe at each step. This way, when the dessert turns out the way she wants, she knows exactly how to recreate it.

healthy high-protein gluten-free donut

This fun donut has 8 grams of protein in it! (Photo: Instagram @sarahlynnfitness)

Not only are all of the recipes in Sarah’s BakeToBeFit eCookbooks gluten-free, refined sugar-free, and vegan-friendly, they are also packed with protein so they will keep you full for longer and can also be used as a post-workout snack. She accomplishes this by using ingredients like unsweetened apple sauce, gluten-free flour substitutes like oat and coconut flours, and her go-to protein powders (details in her FAQ page) which use minimal ingredients and are free of artificial sweeteners and flavors.

Most importantly, Sarah’s desserts taste amazing. “I feel like there are a lot of diets that are really strict, and they make you feel miserable. I don’t think that’s actually healthy. I think it’s great when you can incorporate food that is still pretty healthy but tastes really good and uses good ingredients.” More than the calorie or nutrient content of her recipes, Sarah is concerned with how her desserts make you feel. Sarah’s dessert recipes use healthier ingredients than their traditional counterparts and are relatively low in sugar so you can indulge in these desserts knowing that they will also help fuel your body.

healthy dessert chocolate instagram food porn

Sarah’s recipes always come with many substitution recommendations so anyone can try them!
(Photo: Instagram @sarahlynnfitness)

Because Sarah has Celiac Disease, she is very considerate of the various food restrictions and preferences her audience might have. The FAQ page on her website thoroughly discusses the content of her recipes and her suggestions for substitutions so that anyone can feel comfortable purchasing her books. In addition, each of her eCookbooks has an “Ingredients and Substitutions” page where she details how the recipes can be adapted to meet individual needs.

While all of Sarah’s recipes are gluten-free, she emphasizes that she wants her recipes to be for everyone. She feels that a lot of people who are not gluten-free tend to avoid gluten-free products and recipes. “I used to be like that,” she explains, “if I saw gluten-free bread at the supermarket, I wouldn’t buy that. I would feel like I didn’t need to.” As someone who has no food restrictions, I can personally attest to the fact that you do not have to be gluten-free to want to devour one of Sarah’s desserts. One of the best brownies I have ever had, gluten-free or not, was one of Sarah’s.

healthy chocolate chip cookie dessert food porn

“These cookies are completely oil/butter-free, gluten-free, grain-free, vegan friendly, no sugar added, and super easy to make” (Photo and caption: Instagram @sarahlynnfitness)

Be sure to check out Sarah’s amazing desserts on her Instagram @sarahlynnfitness and the @baketobefit account. Be warned: soon you won’t be able to think about anything but her brownies, donuts, cookies, and cakes. If you find yourself drooling uncontrollably, visit her website baketobefit.com or youtube channel for access to her four eCookbooks as well as some free recipes!

Nako Kobayashi is a first-year AFE student who is always insatiably hungry. She would like to say that her favorite pastime is cooking but in reality, she spends much more time endlessly scrolling through photos of food on Instagram.

The Top 10 Boston Food Events of Spring 2018

by Liz Learned

Attention: Do you love food? Are you looking for fun events to attend in the Boston area this spring? If your answers are yes and yes, then I’ve got good news for you! I’ve searched high and low to compile a list of the top 10 can’t-miss Boston food events this spring. This wide range of food-festivals has something for everyone. Whether you’re tight on cash or an avid charity-donor, a vegetarian or a meat-lover, you’ll find something to add to your calendar!

 

Cambridge Winter Farmers Market

Photo: Cambridgewinterfarmersmarket.com

  1. Cambridge Winter Farmers Market

When: Saturday, April 7th, 10:00 AM-2:00 PM

Where: Cambridge Community Center Gym

To kick things off, the Cambridge Winter Farmers Market will hold its last event of the season on April 7th. The indoor market hosts over two dozen vendors, offering a wide variety of locally sourced goods. You can head to this one-stop shop to stock up on fresh produce, dairy products, meats and fish, fresh-pressed juices, breads and baked goods, specialty foods (jams, pastas, vinegars, etc.), and even body care products. Or, grab some friends and turn this trip into a meal by enjoying a prepared ethnic lunch from vendors such as Indonesian Three Magnolias and Mr. Tamole. This market does not require a membership and admission is entirely free of cost. Even if you’re short on cash, you can still hit up this market to enjoy the live music and free samples!

 

  1. 16th Annual Taste of South Boston

When: Sunday, April 8th, 6:00 PM-9:00 PM

Where: Plaza Ballroom at the Seaport Hotel

Make your way over to the Seaport waterfront to explore the offerings of South Boston’s restaurants. With over 30 participating establishments to sample from, you’re certainly in for a culinary adventure! Whether it’s Loco’s Mexican flavors, Legal Test Kitchen’s seafood specialties, Blue Dragon’s Asian masterpieces, or Sweet Tooth’s baked goods, even the pickiest of eaters could find themselves in flavor heaven at this event. While this is a pricier outing—at $55 per online ticket and $65 per ticket at the door—your money will not go to waste. Not only are you getting the opportunity to sample dishes from South Boston’s finest restaurants, but the proceeds directly support the South Boston Neighborhood Development Corporation. The mission of this non-profit organization is to provide affordable housing for the community, support the economic development of small businesses, improve access to healthy foods, and address environmental issues.

 

  1. North End Pasta Crawl

When: Monday, April 16th, 4:00 PM-5:30 PM

Where: Boston Public Market

If you’ve hopped on the charity bandwagon with the last event, then be sure to also check out the North End Pasta Crawl. The proceeds will support the Roxbury Youth Orchestra, a project run by Revolution of Hope that aims to transform the lives of inner-city youth by offering community, teaching workforce skills, and creating an artistic outlet. With the purchase of the $55 pasta crawler ticket, you receive a commemorative T-shirt and get to enjoy samples from four of the North End’s restaurants. Are you a wine lover? If so, upgrade to VIP for $10 more and get two glasses of wine during your crawl! Whether you’re a pasta fanatic, a charity supporter, or a runner looking to carbo-load after completing the Boston Marathon, you don’t want to miss this Marathon Monday event!

 

Colorful taco from taco festival

Photo: Tacofestivalboston.com

  1. Boston Taco Festival

When: Saturday & Sunday, May 5-6th, 10:00 AM-10:00PM

Where: City Hall Plaza

If the last two events were outside of your budget, have no fear because this Cinco de Mayo celebration will likely fit the bill without shorting on the fun! The $15 general admission pass gets you access to a day of live music, taco vendors, beer tents, lucha libre wrestling, taco eating contests, and best taco award ceremonies. For the hardcore Taco Fest enthusiasts: upgrade to VIP for $60 more and get a variety of perks, including early admission, open bar access, free taco vouchers, raffle tickets, complimentary corn tortillas, and a bottle of Rocky’s Hot Sauce.

 

  1. Farm Share Fair 2018

When: Thursday, May 10th, 5:30 PM-8:30 PM

Where: The Center for Arts at the Armory (Somerville)

Have you found that living in the city is a barrier to accessing fresh, local food? If you’re interested in getting easy, convenient, and consistent access to fresh produce (and perhaps local meat, eggs, and cheeses, too) then Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) is definitely for you. CSAs are a farm sharing method in which customers pay an up-front cost and then receive weekly distributions of seasonal goods. The Farm Share Fair is an opportunity to learn more about the economic, environmental, and health benefits of CSAs, as well as to compare the different programs that are available (varying in-home delivery vs. pick up, types of products, and more). So, whether you’re new to CSAs or a current participant seeking more knowledge on program variety, don’t hesitate to attend this free event!

 

  1. Lamb Jam

When: Sunday, May 20th, 3:00 PM- 6:00 PM

Where: SoWa Power Station

If you’re anything like me, then you’ve spent countless hours getting emotionally invested in episodes of Food Network’s “Chopped”. Well, lucky for us, Lamb Jam is the chance to become a part of the action! Next month, 16 of New England’s most talented chefs will compete in a live cook-off for the title of “Lamb Jam Boston Champion.” The intention of this event is to celebrate the efforts of 80,000+ family-operated farms across the nation. For $75 you will not only get to watch the action unfold live, but also get the chance to vote, eat, and have fun. Admission includes access to a festival of bartenders, winemakers, brewers, and culinary expert demonstrations, and it’s all accompanied by live music and art!

 

Participating Contestants Gourmet Ice Cream Bowl

Participating Contestants (Photo: wbgh.org/events)

  1. The Gourmet Ice Cream Bowl

When: Wednesday, May 23rd, 7:00 PM-9:00 PM

Where: WGBH Studios (Brighton)

Breaking news: ice cream is not just for kids! If you have a sweet tooth, this 21+ event is perfect for you. By purchasing a $25 admissions ticket, you will get the opportunity to sample a variety of ice cream (from classic to innovative) from four competing local brands. Make this outing of ice cream-sampling, vote-casting, and drink-sipping a fun night with your friends! The event will conclude with the ceremonious awarding of best chocolate, best wild card, and people’s choice ice creams. But if the ice cream and competitive atmosphere isn’t enough to draw you in, perhaps you will be motivated by the fact that “Holiday Baking Championship” finalist Joshua Livsey as well as “Chopped Grill Master” & “Top Chef” All-Star Tiffani Faison will be in attendance as guest judges!

 

  1. Fine Art & Food Trucks

When: Saturday, June 2nd, 11:00 AM-6:00 PM

Where: Babcock Street (Coolidge Corner)

If you love art as much as you love food, then this free outdoor art festival is a must. Enjoy indulgences from Boston-based food trucks as you peruse and shop the work of 70 selected artists and makers. Choose between Bon Me’s innovative Asian dishes, The Chubby Chickpea’s Middle Eastern cuisine, The Dining Car’s gourmet sandwiches and salads, Revelry’s Cajun and Creole flavors, and the Trolley Dog’s unique hot dog menu… or try them all! And while you’re there, be sure to check out Hive—a mobile event space offering a lounge and full-service bar with a unique cocktail menu.

 

  1. Taste of the Nation

When: Tuesday, June 5th, 7:00 PM-9:30 PM

Where: Cruiseport Boston

While this event is the most expensive on the list—ringing in at $95 for general admission—it certainly should not be ignored, as 100% of the proceeds from this event will support No Kid Hungry’s effort to end childhood hunger. Over 60 of Boston’s top culinary professionals will offer tastings of their creations, paired with premium beers, wines, and spirits. Last year’s event raised over $140,000 toward No Kid Hungry’s important cause, so now is your chance to get involved!

 

Boston Food trucks downtown at an event

Boston food trucks at an outdoor event (Photo: invisiblepotbelly.wordpress.com)

  1. Summer Solstice Celebration

When: Thursday, June 21st, 5:00 PM-9:00 PM

Where: Harvard Museums of Science & Culture

Finally, say goodbye to Spring with a bang! On the longest day of the year, the Harvard Museum of Science and Culture is offering free admission to their solstice event, which includes access to all four museums, live performances, flower-crown crafting, and other sun-inspired activities. Most importantly (in my opinion), an assortment of Boston’s best food trucks will be present, providing the fuel to accompany the fun!

 

Liz Learned is a first-year MS student in the Nutrition Interventions, Communication, and Behavior Change program at Tufts University’s Friedman School. Liz currently works as the Communications Research Assistant for the USAID funded Food Aid Quality Review project here at Friedman. She received her BS from Union College in 2017, with a major in Psychology and minor in Sociology. Outside of academia, you can find Liz hiking, cooking, and spending time with her dog! 

From Blue to Green, and Everything in Between: The Evolution of Saint Patrick’s Day

by Megan Maisano

Saint Patrick’s Day—when wearing green, eating corned beef and cabbage, and drinking beer has nothing to do with Saint Patrick himself. This month, Megan Maisano explains the history behind the holiday and the American influence on its evolution and popularity.

Somewhere behind the green shamrocks, the Kiss Me, I’m Irish attire, the corned beef and pints of Guinness, lies the fascinating history of Saint Patrick’s Day. The holiday that began as a religious observance for the patron saint of Ireland in the early 10th century, has evolved into an international celebration of Irish culture.

But when it comes to the modern practices we often associate with the holiday … they may as well be as Irish as Saint Patrick himself (hint – he’s not Irish).

Saint Patrick (Photo: history.com)

Saint Patrick (Photo: history.com)

History of Saint Patrick

The story of Saint Patrick dates back to the fifth century. Originally named Maewyn Succat, the saint was born to a wealthy family in Britain. When he was a teenager, he was taken as a slave to Ireland and put to work as a shepherd. A religious experience inspired him to become a priest after his escape, and eventually return to the island as a missionary. Legend has it that Saint Patrick banished all the snakes from Ireland. While that may sound impressive, truth-be-told there were never any snakes on the island to begin with. The story is often used as an allegory to explain how he converted the Irish from Paganism to Catholicism. March 17th marks the date of Saint Patrick’s supposed death and has remained a holy day ever since.

American Influence

Until the 1700’s, Saint Patrick’s Day was a holy, and quite somber, day for Irish Christians. But as more Irishmen immigrated to the U.S., particularly during the Great Potato Famine in the mid 1800’s, the holy day became a time for connection amongst Irish immigrants and an outlet to celebrate their shared history. Irish organizations and societies arose, and in 1848, New York City had the first official Saint Patrick’s Day Parade. What was once a holy day of obligation slowly transformed into a patriotic one-day reprieve from lent, allowing indulgences like meat, alcohol, music and festivity. Today, Saint Patrick’s Day is one of the most globally celebrated national holidays.

Saint Patrick’s Day: Things Explained

The Wearing Of Green (Lyrics: irishmusicdaily.com)

The Wearing Of Green (Lyrics: irishmusicdaily.com)

Green Everything

Up until the 18th century, the color associated with the Order of Saint Patrick was actually blue. The significance of the color green stems from supporters of the Irish Rebellion of 1798, showing their solidarity against the British in red and their loyalty to the native Irish shamrock.

 

Shamrocks (Photo: Pixabay)

Shamrocks (Photo: Pixabay)

Shamrocks

A popular legend about Saint Patrick is that he used a shamrock as a way to symbolize the Holy Trinity and win over Irish Christians. Each leaf of the native clover represented the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. The shamrock became an even greater symbol of Irish nationalism when it was worn during the 1798 rebellion.

 

Corned Beef and Cabbage

Unfortunately, this Saint Patrick’s Day dish does not originate in Ireland. For hundreds of years, the meal had no ties to a specific country, but was rather a practical dish for many European immigrants in the U.S.

The term “corned beef” is British slang for using corn-sized salt crystals to cure meat. In the U.S., few Irish immigrants could find or afford the bacon they grew up with. Instead, they purchased meat from their Jewish neighbors. The kosher butchers made more affordable corned beef from brisket. As a result, the Irish swapped their traditional meal of boiled bacon and potatoes for corned beef and cabbage. Why cabbage? It was one of the cheapest vegetables available.

While the sweet and salty dish gained popularity in immigrant neighborhoods throughout the 19th century, its association with the Irish may not have stuck if it weren’t for George McManus’ popular American comic, “Bringing Up Father.” The comic featured Jiggs and Maggie, an Irish couple who win the lottery and become millionaires. Even as a millionaire, Jiggs’ fondness of playing cards, drinking, smoking, and of course, eating corned beef and cabbage became an influential stereotype of Irish immigrants that lasted beyond the comic strip’s running.

In the mood for this hearty Irish(ish) dish? Try this Genius Kitchen recipe for a crowd-pleasing meal this Saint Patrick’s Day. You’ll get a hefty serving of protein, vitamin B-12, iron, and zinc, as well as vitamin C (boosting that iron absorption), vitamin K, and fiber. The cabbage may also improve your running performance too! Bonus—Guinness beer is one of the ingredients, so you can still technically call it Irish.

Soda Bread

Did you know that there is a Society for the Preservation of Irish Soda Bread? Well there is. And just like corned beef and cabbage, soda bread cannot be credited to the Irish either. Sigh. The dish, which is a variety of quick bread that uses baking soda instead of yeast, traces back to Native Americans who used pearl ash (potassium carbonate) to make bread on hot rocks. The bread became associated with the Irish because of its use during the Great Potato Famine. The recipe required few ingredients, didn’t take long, was dense and hearty, and reduced food waste.

Need a simple, go-to, quick bread recipe? This epicurious recipe for Irish soda bread can be made by even the most novice baker. The added raisins (or Craisins, your choice) can boost its fiber content too.

Beer

While alcohol is often tied into many religious feasts, it wasn’t until the 1970’s that pubs were open on Saint Patrick’s Day in Ireland. As mentioned before, the holiday falls during Lent – a period of Christian repentance. According to a New York Times journalist, Dublin was once “the dullest place on earth to spend St. Patrick’s Day.” But because of the economic and tourism opportunity, Ireland adopted the American way and the rest is drunk history.

Are you a fan of statistics? Then grab yourself a Guinness and learn about how the Student’s T-test was created. Yes, there was Guinness involved.

If baking is more on your mind more than confidence intervals, grab yourself a Guinness AND some Baileys, and make these unforgettable Saint Patrick’s Day cupcakes with this Tide & Thyme recipe (my mother and I made these a few years ago, and I still dream of that Baileys cream frosting).

Conclusion: Who Cares?

Alright, so many of our beloved Saint Patrick’s Day traditions may not necessarily trace to Ireland or to the saint himself. But at the end of the day, who cares? Saint Patrick’s Day offers a nostalgic opportunity for people from all over the world to come together and be Irish for a day. So, go ahead and proudly rock that green t-shirt on March 17th, chances are you won’t be alone.

Megan Maisano is a second year NICBC student and an RD-to-be. Irish by blood and frugal by school, cabbage is a staple food in her fridge. In 2012, she earned her Perfect Pint Pour Certificate from the Guinness factory in Dublin and is available for individual lessons.

References:

  1. Allan, Patrick. The Real History if St. Patrick’s Day. Lifehacker.com. March 2017. Internet: https://lifehacker.com/the-real-history-of-st-patrick-s-day-1793354674 (accessed February 2018).
  2. Binchy, Maeve. A Pint for St. Patrick in the New Ireland. The New York Times. March 2001. Internet: http://www.nytimes.com/2001/03/17/opinion/a-pint-for-st-patrick-in-the-new-ireland.html (accessed February 2018).
  3. Binder, Julian. The ‘historical’ Saint Patrick. Approaching the Life of Ireland’s Patron Saint. GRIN Verlag. Norderstedt, Germany. 2015.
  4. Cronin, M. and Adair, D. Wearing of green: A history of St. Patrick’s Day. Routledge. London. 2002.
  5. History.com. The History of Saint Patrick’s Day. 2009. Internet: http://www.history.com/topics/st-patricks-day/history-of-st-patricks-day (accessed February 2018).
  6. O’Dwyer, Edward. The History of Soda Bread. The Society for the Preservation of Irish Soda Bread. Internet: http://www.sodabread.info/history/ (accessed February 2018).
  7. Ruby, Jeff. Even the Irish Hate Corned Beef and Cabbage. The Daily Beast. March 2017. Internet: https://www.thedailybeast.com/even-the-irish-hate-corned-beef-and-cabbage (accessed February 2018).

A Magical (Food) Journey

by Hannah Macfarlane

Some people visit theme parks to go on the rides, others go to investigate the food. For Hannah Macfarlane, her winter vacation presented an opportunity for both. Keep reading to explore Orlando’s famous parks as told through meals and learn some tips for eating your way to a great vacation .

Over winter break, my mom and I headed to Orlando for four days of theme park hopping: two days at Walt Disney World and two days at Universal Studios. We walked more than forty miles, rode nearly every roller coaster designed for people over the age of six, and took lots of awkward selfies so our family at home in the Northeast could envy the beautiful weather. And because I am a food-loving nutrition student, I made it my mission to find the healthiest, most satisfying theme park food I could.

Quick disclaimer: if you want to eat cheeseburgers, churros, and cotton candy while you’re on vacation (or not), go for it! No food is bad food, ESPECIALLY when you’re in the Happiest Place on Earth™. For me, eating balanced meals was important because I have a sensitive stomach and experience acid reflux, so my goal was to find foods that wouldn’t make me feel sick while riding roller coasters that made me feel sick. Isn’t that great logic?

Day 0:

We had originally planned to do one day at Disney and two at Universal, but thanks to some last minute inspiration and a free flight change from Delta, we ended up arriving in Orlando a day early. That meant more time for rides, and more food to eat! Before we checked into our hotel, we stopped by the supermarket (Publix, obviously) to pick up some food and local beer for our mini fridge. Breakfast ended up being the one meal that stayed consistent all week: fresh berries with plain Greek yogurt and chocolate granola, and whatever coffee we could find. I referred to my breakfast as “room service,” but really it was my wonderful mother waiting on me so I could sleep in. She’s a saint.

Day 1:

Not food, but I had to throw in a photo of Cinderella's castle at night! (Image source: Author)

Not food, but I had to throw in a photo of Cinderella’s castle at night! (Image source: Author)

We officially began our adventure in the utopia that is Magic Kingdom. I’d downloaded the Disney World app the previous week and looked at the menus about 17 times each, so I knew I wanted to drag my mom to Columbia Harbour House for lunch. I ordered the Grilled Salmon; she had the Broccoli Peppercorn Salad. The food was good, but the best part of the meal was making a new friend in the form of a flight attendant from Seattle who had run the “Dopey Challenge” the previous weekend—a 5K, 10K, half marathon, and full marathon in sequential days. I discovered that not only are there obsessed Disney World fans and obsessed runners, there are a ton of people out there who are both. Personally, I prefer to get my physical activity in by skipping from ride to ride, but to each their own.

For dinner, we swung by the Pecos Bill Tall Tale Inn, located in the Frontier Land area. I went for the tacos, but quickly fell in love when I discovered the UNLIMITED GUACAMOLE. Yes, you read that right. After you order your food—I got a Taco Trio with Seasoned Ground Beef, Seasoned Chicken, and Spicy Breaded Cauliflower topped with 5-spice Yogurt and Pineapple Salsa – you head to the toppings bar for all the fixin’s. I am not kidding when I say I helped myself to a full cup of guacamole, or $10 worth if we’re talking in Chipotle terms.

Day 2:

This was our longest day; we were in the parks from 8 am (pre-rope drop for those in the know) to 11 pm. Lunch was this bowl from Satu’li Canteen in the new Pandora section of Animal Kingdom, and it was DELICIOUS. I hadn’t decided what to eat until I walked past the restaurant and scoped out the menu (I spent a lot of time looking at menus, clearly). As soon as I saw it was a build-your-own-bowl place, I knew I had to get that food in my belly. I would have gone back for dinner but we were in Epcot by that point. Go to Pandora for the food, stay to watch people suffer through the ridiculously long lines for the Avatar Flight of Passage ride.

(Image source: Author)

(Image source: Author)

Our second park dinner was our only real sit-down meal during the four days of park hopping. One of my mom’s best friends and her daughter had planned a trip to Disney at the same time, so we met up at Restaurant Marrakesh in the World Showcase. My mom and I ordered two dishes—Roast Lamb Meshoui and Shish Kebab—and swapped halfway through so we could try both. Honestly, the best part of the World Showcase is the food—you can try food from all around the world in one place!

A typical menu at Universal Studios. (Image source: Author)

A typical menu at Universal Studios. (Image source: Author)

Day 3:

As much as I love Disney (and I do LOVE Disney), I was most excited to visit Universal for one reason only: the Wizarding World of Harry Potter. I don’t love being surrounded by hordes of people, but I’m happy to deal with crowds of Muggles trying to catch a photo of the Gringotts dragon mid-fire breath.

The food at Universal Studios is generally pretty limited, making me wish there were house elves on hand to cook up our favorite foods. When you search the park’s website for “healthy options” in the two main parks you get one result, and it costs $50 for an adult. That said, it’s the Marvel meet-and-greet restaurant, so you may get to hang out with Thor.

I made the rookie mistake of winging lunch that day, and I ended up struggling to find something that met my requirements (read: not a burger and fries) while fighting through my “hanger.” We finally ended up at Bumblebee Man’s Taco Truck for—you guessed it—more tacos. Sadly, the guacamole there was NOT unlimited, but I did enjoy the Korean beef. Universal closed at the non-magical hour of 7 pm, so we didn’t waste time getting dinner at the park. Why eat when you can ride the Hulk again and again?

Sunset over Hogsmeade. (Image source: Author)

Sunset over Hogsmeade. (Image source: Author)

Day 4:

After my lunchtime annoyance of the previous day, I had already decided to visit Fire Eater’s Grill for our final lunch. The food wasn’t the best, but my gyro came with a side of veggies (carrots and celery sticks) and hummus. Not too shabby! Disappointingly, there were no fire eaters to be found. 

Ice cream at Florean Fortescue's Ice Cream Parlour (*authentic British spelling!) (Image source: Author)

Ice cream at Florean Fortescue’s Ice Cream Parlour (*authentic British spelling!) (Image source: Author)

I only got ice cream once during our four days in the park, but this cup from Florean Fortescue’s Ice Cream Parlour* was totally worth the wait. As a huge Harry Potter fan, just having the experience of eating ice cream in Diagon Alley would have been enough for me; this ice cream also happened to be incredibly tasty. My mom and I ordered separately and somehow both ended up with salted caramel blondie and clotted cream. Accio deliciousness!

After picking up souvenirs at Wiseacre’s Wizarding Equipment, we headed back to Hogsmeade only to discover that the park closed at 6 pm. I didn’t get to ride Harry Potter and the Forbidden Journey again, but we did have extra time to get tasty Ethiopian food for dinner near our hotel.

Overall, I was pretty satisfied with the food I found at both parks, especially Disney World. It definitely takes some effort and planning, but there are vegetables to be found! Most importantly, I had a blast.

Tips:

  1. Do breakfast/coffee in the hotel so you’re in a good mood by the time you reach the park. Those crowds can be brutal and you don’t want to face them when you’re hangry (trust me on that one).
  2. Bring snacks. I had plenty of dried mango in my bag so that I could raise my blood sugar whenever I felt myself getting cranky (see above). We also had pretzels, cheese crackers, beef jerky, nuts, and granola bars—snacking is a serious business for us!
  3. Plan ahead. This is especially true if you have any kind of dietary restrictions. I’m just picky, but I still got a little hangry (again, see above) on the one day I didn’t pick a lunch spot ahead of time. (Sorry, Mom!)
  4. Look into the meal plans. We didn’t do this, but both Disney and Universal offer flat rate meal plans that are accepted at many on-site dining locations. As a bonus, you’ll feel like a freshman again!

Hannah Macfarlane is a second year student in the Nutrition Interventions, Communication, and Behavior Change program. Her favorite activities include re-reading Harry Potter, snacking, and pretending to be a kid again.