Moving Through Winter

by Sara Scinto

Do you dread winter because it keeps you from engaging in exercise that you love? Are you looking for new ways to move your body that don’t involve the gym? Are you interested in making the best of what this cold season has to offer? Then read further for thoughts and ideas on how to move through winter with more enjoyment.

If you were anywhere in the Northeast during this holiday season, you likely experienced at least one major winter storm, cold spell, or both. Living in Northeastern Ohio where the lake effect snow regularly comes down by the foot, I encountered multiple while I was home for break. If you are an active biker, walker, or runner, snow and ice can really throw a wrench in your usual physical activity schedule. This is especially true if the mere thought of a treadmill (known to many as the “dreadmill”), stationary bike, or indoor pool makes you cringe. But instead of lamenting about these seasonal limitations, you can change your perspective on winter; it actually is an excellent time to try alternative types of movement, both indoors and outside.

Attending group workout classes is one way to build up body heat, fight frigid temperatures, and experience new forms of exercise during the chilly stretch between November and March. For me, hot yoga is the most effective remedy for the constant cold and low energy I often experience during winter. It leaves me feeling warm and relaxed for the rest of the day, as long as I make sure to take a shower and put on dry clothes before walking back into the brisk air (wearing sweaty clothes in the cold is a recipe for disaster). As Friedman students, we are fortunate enough to have multiple studios within walking distance of our school; just minutes down Harrison Avenue, there is both a Turnstyle (cycling) and a Corepower (varying levels of hot yoga) studio. If you’re looking for a nearby studio that offers something really different, check out Swet Studio, which has rowing, aerial yoga, and other antigravity activities! And if none of those get you excited, check out this list of 10 local classes that get your body moving in creative ways.

Title Boxing Club Boston Nutrition Students

Me and my friend after trying out boxing together (Photo: Sara Scinto)

Admittedly, these classes are often outside a graduate student budget, but some studios offer student discounts or even a first class for free! Although you may realize at the end of the class that it’s not for you, the complimentary class allows you to determine that without having to pay for something you don’t end up liking.

Another more affordable option for Friedman students is the Wang YMCA, where there is a wide selection of classes like Tai Chi, Zumba, cycling, and high intensity interval training (H.I.I.T) classes, just to name a few. With the discounted membership rate information that was emailed to all Tufts Boston Health Sciences students before the start of the fall semester, you can purchase a monthly membership to the YMCA for the same (or lower) price as most single exercise studio classes. Although the Wang YMCA is the closest location to Friedman, a membership allows you to get into YMCA branches all over Boston. This gives you access to even more varieties of physical activity like power yoga, barre, and kickboxing.

Even though it may not seem like it, winter is also a terrific season to experience the outdoors in a way that does not involve running or biking. Despite living in the snow belt nearly my entire life, I’ve only just begun to explore snow sports. And while not every winter sport is for me, I’ve found activities like snowshoeing to be wonderful. Trekking through a forest while the snow clings to the bare trees like floating cotton balls is breathtaking in more ways than one! Although my hands were frozen for the first 20 minutes, the discomfort was worth being able to view winter and snow in a completely new and appreciative way.

Sara Scinto Snowshoeing Massachusetts

A beautiful winter forest while snowshoeing (Photo: Sara Scinto)

Lack of equipment may seem like a big barrier for engaging in winter sports, but many places offer rentals at a reasonable price. Snowshoeing and cross-country skiing are generally less expensive options compared to snowboarding and downhill skiing, although there are ways to save on ski lift tickets. Making a day trip with some friends to engage in snow sports can be a perfect opportunity to get outside of the city and breathe some crisp, fresh air. Here is a great resource on locations near Boston to snowshoe, ski, and snowboard (I can confirm the Weston Ski Track is great for beginners). And if you don’t have a mode of transportation out of town, don’t worry! There’s still plenty of outdoor fun to take advantage of in Boston, including something called “frost bite” sailing on the Charles River (for experienced sailors) and ice skating and sledding in the Boston Common. Because in case you needed a reminder, you’re never too old for sledding. And marching back up Beacon Hill over and over really gets your heart pumping!

Winter offers an abundance of ways to move your body, some of which wouldn’t even be possible in other seasons. Although the urge to stay snuggled underneath the covers is strong, I encourage you to try a new activity this year that will help you view winter as a season of opportunity and discovery, rather than a season of limitations.

 

Sara Scinto is a second-year NICBC student, avid coffee drinker, runner, triathlete, and yogi. She has a love for rainbows and all things food/nutrition related. During the winter, she enjoys staying warm and active with yoga and running outside in *almost* any weather conditions (to avoid the treadmill). You can find her on Instagram @saras_colorfull_life.

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A Statement of Support to our Colleagues at the Fletcher School

by The Friedman Justice League

The Friedman Justice League responds to Anthony Scaramucci’s resignation from the Advisory Board at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy on November 28, 2017. “Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it’s the only thing that ever has.” – Margaret Mead

By Jdarsie11 (Own work) [CC BY-SA 4.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

By Jdarsie11 (Own work) [CC BY-SA 4.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

The Friedman Justice League, with support from the Friedman Sprout, is writing to state its solidarity with the students at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy who bravely spoke out when they felt that a member of the Fletcher Advisory Board was not upholding the school’s core values. As a student organization, The Friedman Justice League is committed to finding ways to allow the Friedman community to better address issues of discrimination and oppression in its teachings, research, and programs. We believe the actions taken by fellow students at the Fletcher school reflect this same mission, and for that we affirm our support.

On November 28, financier and former White House Communications Director Anthony Scaramucci resigned from the Fletcher School’s Advisory Board after students and faculty rightly called attention to the discrepancy between his unethical behavior and the values befitting a Fletcher School board member. Earlier in November, Camilo Caballero, a graduate student at Fletcher, wrote an op-ed calling for Scaramucci’s removal from the board, following a petition by fellow student Carter Banker to remove Scaramucci from the board. In the op-ed, he described Scaramucci as an “irresponsible, inconsistent and unethical opportunist,” questioning his position on the Advisory board. They feared that the university was foregoing the long-term benefit of upholding its core values for the short-term benefit of monetary gain. Clearly, the actions Scaramucci took towards Caballero–to threaten a lawsuit because of our fellow student’s opinion–illustrate that his values may no longer align with those of the school, and thus he was no longer fit to continue serving on the board.

Our colleagues at the Fletcher school held themselves accountable for creating the change they wished to see within their institution. Rather than resigning themselves to defeat, they took action when they perceived an injustice. They took action when they perceived that “the power of money [was] taking precedent over the power of values.” We stand in solidarity with the brave steps taken by Camilo Caballero and Carter Banker.

We recognize that our Fletcher colleagues Caballero, Banker, and the editors and staff at The Tufts Daily published their articles at great personal risk to themselves, and we applaud them for doing so. In a statement on behalf of the Friedman Sprout, current co-editor Kathleen Nay says,Though we hope our writers would never feel intimidated or harassed into silence by outside forces, the Friedman Sprout upholds its commitment to empowering students’ voices, especially when challenging injustices in our school’s administration and in our food system more broadly.”

In keeping with the University’s vision “to be an innovative university of creative scholars…who have a profound impact on one another and the world,” we should be proud of our Fletcher colleagues for demonstrating the power of democratic free speech, civic engagement, and commitment to values over financial gain. We hope that should an occasion ever arise, the community at the Friedman School would respond with the same amount of conviction and integrity these students exemplified. The Friedman School prides itself in generating trusted science, educating future leaders, and creating a positive impact in the world of food and nutrition. We know that this is only truly possible if we have trusted experts and citizens at the helm guiding it in the right direction. Anything short of this would place the credibility of Friedman, and by extension the science and policy its research generates, at risk.

Moving forward, we also believe it is in the best interest of the university to develop a process for removing board members that are no longer fit to advise our school. Executive Director of Public Relations Patrick Collins noted that there is no known precedent for removing an advisor from a board; they have only resigned when new positions create conflicts of interest. Although in this case Scaramucci resigned, we believe that no person should take being placed in such an honorable position for granted, and that as representatives of our institution they should be held to the highest standards of morality both within and outside of board meetings. We hope that the administration will take action to ensure that only those who continue to uphold the university’s values continue to have the privilege of a seat on the Board of Advisors.

With the brave voices of a few, our colleagues at the Fletcher school made national waves and created an impact that we believe makes Tufts University a more just and ethically consistent institution. We reaffirm our support of the actions of our fellow students. They inspire us at Friedman to remember to be vigilant, to speak up, and to never underestimate the power of your own voice.

In solidarity,

The Friedman Justice League
Alejandra Cabrera, NICBC 18
Tessa Salzman, AFE/UEP 18
Julie Kurtz, AFE/MPH 18
Casey Leger, NICBC 18
Yvonne Socolar, AFE 18
Kristin Sukys, AFE 18
John VanderHeide, AFE/UEP 18
Kirsten Archer, FPAN/MPH 17
Kathleen Nay, AFE/UEP 18
Eliza Hallett, NICBC 19
Alyssa Melendez, AFE 19
Hannah Meier, NutComm 18
Michelle Darian, NICBC/MPH 19
Megan Maisano, NICBC 18
Sara Scinto, NICBC 18
Jennifer Oslund, FPAN 19
Sabrina Kerin, AFE, 19
Jennifer Pustz, NICBC/MPH 19
Leah Powley, AFE 18
Michelle Rossi, NICBC/MPH 18
Hattie Brown, FPAN 19
Ryan Nebeker, AFE 19
Eliot Martin, FPAN 19
Maria Wrabel, FPAN, 18
Katherine Rancaño, NEPI 17/NICBC 20
Rachel Baer, NICBC 18
Madeline Bennett, FPAN 17
Alana Davidson, FPAN 19
Simon Ye, BMN 17/20
Jessica Manly, AFE 18
Caitlin Matthews, AFE/UEP 17
Amy Byrne, AFE/MPH 19
Ayten Salahi, FPAN/DPD 20
Theodore Fitopoulos, FPAN 18
Kimberly Lagasse, NICBC 18
Rachel Hoh, AFE/ UEP 19
Molly Knudsen, NICBC 19
Victoria Chase, AFE 18
Caitlin Bailey, NICBC 19
Sarah Chang, AFE/MPH 16
Suzanne Kline, FPAN 19
Carla Curle, AFE 16
Hannah Packman, AFE 16
Dianna Bartone, FPAN/MPH 17
Elisabeth Learned, NICBC 19
Bridget Gayer, FPAN/MPH 18
Abel Sandoval, NICBC 18
Rebecca Cohen, BMN 19
Nayla Bezares, AFE 19
Sabina C Robillard, FPAN 17
Laura Gallagher, AFE 19
Natalie Kaner, AFE 18
Lindsay Margolis, NICBC 17
Tori Wong, AFE 18
Megan Lehnerd, N14/PhD 18
Laura Walsh, NICBC 19
Alison Brown, FPAN 17
Marielle Hampton, AFE 19
Christine Sinclair, NICBC 19
Rebecca Boehm, AFE 12/17
Johanna Andrews Trevino, FPAN 18

A Slice of Italy in Allston

by Megan Maisano

It’s the end of the semester. Motivation for cooking and weekly meal prep is low. Are you yearning for some Italian comfort fare, but don’t want to make the trek to North End? Fear not. This hidden gem will fill your heart and your belly.

As soon as I walked into the restaurant, I felt at home and part of la famiglia. Packed in tightly among 12 tables were families and friends, hunched over their meals in conversation, accompanied by glasses of wine and fresh bruschetta. The small room was filled with stories, laughter, and the smell of warm tomato sauce. I turned to my husband, Andrew, and got a nod of approval. It was our first time at Carlo’s Cucina in Allston.

Snuggled between a Vietnamese and Chinese restaurant on Brighton Ave, Carlo’s Cucina (pronounced coo-CHEE-nah) was nearly full on a Tuesday night. We snagged a table next to the kitchen in the back, with optimal views of the place in action. Paintings of the Italian countryside covered the walls and wisps of white painted clouds dotted the blue ceiling. Servers scooted between tables, waiting their turn to walk through the narrow passes, cracking jokes in Italian with regulars along the way.

The restaurant itself offers a no-frills dining experience. The table is set with paper placemats and napkins, and not much space for elbow room. While the ambience at Carlo’s Cucina may not compare to the gusto of dining in Boston’s North End Italian restaurants, the food will keep us coming back.

As someone who married into an Italian family and once took a cooking class in Tuscany, I like to believe I have developed a taste for authentic Italian food. But just to be sure my taste was true, I invited Andrew along for a second opinion. And let me tell you, we experienced some anguish when deciding what to order – we wanted to try it all! In addition to the usual spread of antipasti (appetizers), primi (pasta dishes) and secondi piatti (protein dishes), there was also a Specialità della Casa section.

While we examined the menu, our server brought us complimentary toasted bread, pimento stuffed olives, and olive oil. We did our best not to overindulge before our meal, but it was hard to pass up the aroma of freshly baked bread and olive oil.

For our antipasti, we ordered the fried eggplant, Melanzane Ripiene ($10). Laid over a large plate was eight inches of crisp eggplant rolled up with ricotta that oozed out of its sides, and topped with marinara sauce and broiled mozzarella that stuck to our forks. It was heavenly. In a rare act of self-control, we asked for a box to save half of this God-sent dish for later.

We decided to skip the primi piatti: with their generous portion sizes, I can’t imagine ordering more than one course here again. For the secondi piatti, we ordered off the specialty menu. I chose the Pollo Gerardo ($20), a chicken Marsala dish with tomatoes, peppers, and olives. Andrew chose the Vitello Carlo ($23), a popular Yelp pick of veal stuffed with artichokes, prosciutto and Fontina cheese, and topped with tomato sauce, mushrooms and sautéed onions.

I’m a sucker for a good Marsala sauce, so the Pollo Gerardo hit the spot. The dish had an appropriately oversized piece of chicken, lightly battered and pounded thin. The Marsala sauce was reduced to a thick texture and while it tasted just fine with the toppings, I missed the earthy sautéed mushrooms that traditionally accompanied it. Perhaps next time I’ll stick with the traditional Pollo Marsala dish ($20). Andrew picked the Vitello Carlo because of his love for artichokes. This dish had a lot going on, in a good way. The combination of flavors from the tender veal, plum tomato sauce, artichokes, and creamy Fontina kept us picking at it long after we had our fill. And while we planned to get desert, our stomachs begged for mercy. Next time, Cannoli… Next time.

Pollo Gerardo and remnants of the Melanzane Ripiene. Photo: Megan Maisano

Pollo Gerardo and remnants of the Melanzane Ripiene. Photo: Megan Maisano

By the end of the night, we had sung happy birthday twice to strangers, clapped, and raised our glasses to their fortune. It felt like we were a part of a large family gathering, spread across tables in a dining room, enjoying home-style comfort foods from our very own kitchen.

If you’re looking for authentic Italian dishes without making the arduous trip to the North End, Carlo’s Cucina is your spot. Make reservations, come hungry, and leave a part of la famiglia.

Carlo’s Cucina Italiana
131 Brighton Ave., Allston, 617.254.9759, http://carloscucinaitaliana.com/

Megan Maisano is a second-year Nutrition Communications student, an RD-to-be, and is generally disappointed by small portion sizes. After traveling and eating her way through 24 countries, Italian cuisine remains her personal favorite.

Ten Spots to Try Next Time You Forget Your Lunch

by Erin Child

Forgot your lunch? Too busy to cook? Consider grabbing a friend (or five) and trying out one of these ten eateries near campus. Compiled from a quick survey (a big thanks to the fifteen students who responded!), I’ve got recommendations for holes-in-the-wall that you’ve probably walked by already, hidden gems, and local & national chains with healthy lunch options. Though numbered, this list isn’t meant to be a ranking. Walking times are measured from Jaharis. Cheers & happy eating!

  1. My Thai Vegan Café

3 Beach St. (4 min walk)

My Thai Vegan Café is a popular spot with students. With ample food and bubble tea options, it’s a fun place to come with a friend. Their lunch special runs from noon to 3pm, and for $8 you get the soup-of-the-day, plus either one fried spring roll or two fried dumplings, hot Jasmine tea, and your entrée. One Friedman student surveyed recommended the Mango Curry (it has great coconut flavor!).

  1. The Little Kitchen

22 Kneeland St (2 min walk)

I recently experienced The Little Kitchen for the first time, and boy is it delicious and filling! Pretty much everything costs less than $10 and the portions provide more than enough for lunch and then another meal. Students love their steamed lotus leaf options, highly recommending the chicken and mushroom option.  One student likes that they have a selection of food that they “haven’t seen in other restaurants around Chinatown.” As it’s basically across the street from school, it’s a must to check out.

  1. Clover Food Lab

160 Federal St (11 min walk)

Clover is a local chain that has many food trucks and storefront locations throughout the greater Boston area. Clover is a vegetarian/vegan joint that tries to source their ingredients as locally as possible. They’ve also recently started serving the Impossible Burger at the Harvard Square location and hopefully it will come downtown soon. Lunch there generally costs between $8-$11. Personally, I am mildly obsessed with their chickpea fritter platters. Clover is slightly further away than other options, but worth the walk!

  1. Gourmet Dumpling House

52 Beach St (4 min walk)

I have it on good authority that Gourmet Dumpling House is a wonderful place to bring a bunch of friends, order a ton of food and stuff yourself with savory dumplings and other Chinese dishes. The prices are great, and the food is delicious. If you’re looking for a dumpling fix, one student recommends the mini juicy pork dumplings and Szechuan dumplings, which will “run you about $12.”

  1. Irashi

8 Kneeland St (3 min walk)

Irashi is a sushi and teriyaki restaurant with a great lunch deal. From 11am-4pm, you can buy miso soup, salad and two sushi rolls for under $14. They offer many different combinations of rolls, so there are plenty of options to choose from! If you’re a sushi lover, other places to check out include Avana Sushi (42 Beach St) or Whole Foods (348 Harrison Ave)—the Hirsch Library in the Sackler building recently started serving sushi, but reviews are mixed.

  1. sweetgreen

354 Harrison Ave (7 min walk)

sweetgreen is a national salad & grain bowl chain beloved by many Friedman students. Their bowls are always chock full of veggies, so you get a guaranteed healthy lunch. They easily accommodate dietary restrictions and allergies, so it’s a stress-free stop for many. Lunch starts at about $9, and can increase to $15+ depending on the bowl you choose and what toppings you add (for example, avocado is an extra $2). Students recommend the ‘The Shroomami Bowl’, ‘Harvest Salad’, and ‘My special salad’ (not actually on the menu, and sadly that student did not give us their special ingredient combination).

  1. Chinatown Café

262 Harrison Ave (3 min walk)

Next time you’re thinking of walking down to the Ink Block complex (home to sweetgreen and Whole Foods), consider stopping into the Chinatown Café (it’s that restaurant with the kitchen right on Harrison with hanging ducks in the window). Students say that they have great BBQ, and you get a lot of food for the price. They take cash only, but lunch won’t cost much more than $8 when you get one their rice, meat and veggie combo plates.

  1. 163 Vietnamese Sandwich

66 Harrison Ave (3 min walk)

The banh mi at 163 Vietnamese Sandwich are reportedly delicious, come with vegetarian and meat options, and cost less than $5 each (cash only). The restaurant has seats, but it’s almost always crowded, so you’re better off grabbing a sandwich, or a noodle or rice meal (under $10) to go. Like many spots in Chinatown, they also have bubble tea (yum!).

  1. Boston Kitchen Pizza

1 Stuart St (4 min walk)

Have four minutes to spare and four dollars in your pocket? Run over to Boston Kitchen Pizza for a quick slice. One student recommended the Spinach & Roasted Garlic slice, which will run you less than $4 and sounds delicious! (If you’re looking for cheap eats and not interested in Pizza, The Dumping King at 42 Beach St is another great option.)

  1. Pho Pasteur

682 Washington St (4 min walk)

Pho Pastuer, a Vietnamese restaurant, is but one pho spot in a neighborhood of many (Pho Hoa at 17 Beach St. was also recommended by another student), but it’s been a favorite of mine since I moved to Boston five years ago. Their pho portions are GIANT, cost from $8-$9.50, and is simply the best food on a rainy and cold November day. They have a large menu that offers more than just pho (if that’s not your thing), and offer both take out and sit-down service.

*Bonus Reminder*

Sackler

145 Harrison Ave (30 second walk)

You forgot your lunch, you literally have no time and you’re looking for a cheap, healthy fix? Seriously consider the salad bar on the 4th floor of the Sackler Library. A small salad will run you $5 and they cram the container full of veggies. Sometimes the best option is right in front of you.

Erin Child is a second year NICBC student in the dual MS-DPD program. Up until now, if she ran out of time to pack a lunch she would stubbornly & hangrily wait until she was home to eat. After writing this list she’s been inspired to try new things. Erin is thrilled to be joining the Sprout team as the social media editor this year, and is looking forward to your great articles!

One Hundred and Fifty-Six

One hundred and fifty-six.

That is the number of new, incoming Masters, Ph.D., and Certificate Program students to the Friedman School this year. 156 new faces, new names to learn, new friendships to forge… all future experts in food, nutrition, science, and policy! Let’s break down the numbers.

Friedman's incoming class, 2017.

Friedman’s incoming class, 2017.

To all of you: welcome to Friedman! And for the returning cohorts: welcome back! I’m really excited to meet the new class, and I hope that we’ll cross paths in the halls of Jaharis.

But let’s get to introductions: Hey! I’m Kathleen Nay, co-editor of the Friedman Sprout. I’m a third-year dual degree student in the Agriculture, Food & Environment (AFE) and Urban & Environmental Planning & Policy (UEP) programs. I’m thrilled to be co-editing the Sprout for a second year, and eager to dive head first into my final year of graduate school. In Alberta, Canada—where I hail from—we’d say, “just give’r!” (For those unfamiliar with the verb, Urban Dictionary defines it as “going balls-to-the-wall to take care of business as quickly and awesomely as possible. May or may not involve drop-kicking something without hesitation.” Now you know.)

The past two weeks have been busy for all of us as we shop classes, meet with advisors, finalize schedules, and decide how and where to get involved in student life. At the Friedman Sprout, we’ve been gearing up for an exciting year and planning fun things for our writers (more on that from my illustrious co-editor, Hannah, below). We hope YOU will join us in crafting this year’s Friedman Sprout—a publication produced entirely by students. Please pitch us your ideas, we’d love to hear from you!

If writing isn’t your thing (it is—you just don’t know it yet), there are so many other opportunities to leave your mark on our Friedman community. In this special mid-month issue, you’ll hear from student leaders who are busy planning the year ahead. Student leaders like:

  • Danielle Krobath, Student Council Co-Chair. From the annual Welcome Back Picnic, to advocating for new computers in the student lounge and student-accessible meeting spaces, to the year-end retreat at George’s Island, and everything in between, Student Council is actively engaged in shaping Friedman student life.
  • Simon Ye, Chair of Slow Food Tufts. Slow Food Tufts is a chapter of Slow Food International, a grassroots organization promoting good, clean, and fair food for all. Not only does Slow Food host events like kimchi-making workshops and local chocolate factory tours, it’s a great way to get to know students from other programs and to learn about the greater Boston food community.
  • Bridget Carle and Casey Florea, organizers for Dig In! Nutrition Education (DINE). DINE is an ongoing partnership with third grade classrooms at Josiah Quincy Elementary School, where Friedman students teach lessons on nutrition and food. It’s a low-commitment, but high-fun way to give back to the Chinatown community in a positive way.
  • Hannah Meier, Sara Scinto and Jessie Ellis, advocates of the Friedman Unofficial Running Club (FURC). Got some energy to burn off? Need some friends to hold you to your distance goals? Want to explore new corners of the Boston area on foot? Check these folks out.
  • Kenny Westerman, Katherine Rancano, Jessie Ellis, and Jennifer Huang, coordinators of NewTrition, a TED Talk-style platform for Friedman students to share research and generate discussion about topics in nutrition.
  • Julie Kurtz, member of the Friedman Justice League, a grassroots group committed to making Friedman—and the world—a better place through thoughtful engagement with our food system.

It’s a new year. Let’s make our mark! Hey, Hannah, how is Sprout making our mark this year?

Thanks, Kathleen! I’m super excited about everything we have in the works. Before I get to that, let me introduce myself.

Hi! My name is Hannah Meier, I’m a second-year (fourth semester) student in the Nutrition Communications program and I’m thrilled that I get to be one of the editors of the Sprout this year. I really enjoyed participating as a contributing writer last year. I learned so much about myself as a writer and a professional in the nutrition space, and encourage anyone and everyone to write about the topics they are passionate about—it’s not only a great way to establish more expertise for yourself (and build out that resume!), but an amazing chance to immerse yourself into the buzzing food and nutrition community in Boston.

The Sprout will continue to publish student-written articles monthly. We have traditionally focused on written articles, but would love to see students get creative with other media platforms like video, photography, graphic design, or audio.

If you haven’t signed up to receive communication about writing for the Sprout, send us an email and we’ll get you squared away: friedmansprout@gmail.com.

We are also ramping up our social media presence. We hear you: Facebook is so 2010. While we aren’t leaving Facebook (it’s a great way for us to share the fabulous articles students write with everyone from grandma to embassy ambassadors), we are venturing into other platforms like Instagram, beginning with a collaboration with @Tufts_Nutrition (follow them!). We hope to feature authors, articles, quotes, photography… anything and everything we are proud of by our fabulous contributors.

Speaking of our fabulous contributors, I am very excited to announce that we will debut a new tradition following each publication: Contributor Happy Hours! We all know that writing is rewarding, but sometimes so challenging. We don’t need to go through the rollercoaster in isolation! We are already excited to bask in the glow of publication bliss with fellow student writers and a fun beverage of choice. Social hour + incentive to write resume-boosting food and ag pieces, yes please!

Finally, Kathleen and I are working hard to pull together writing workshops this year, hosted by the Sprout and featuring influential voices in the food and nutrition writing space. We hope that these offer an opportunity to learn from the pro’s, get expert opinion on your assignments and submissions, and sharpen your writing skills. Writing, and communication in general, is critical when it comes to exerting expert influence within our fields, and we are excited to bring this learning opportunity to all Friedman students.

In good health,

Hannah and Kathleen

Friedman Sprout Co-Editors, Hannah Meier and Kathleen Nay

Friedman Sprout Co-Editors, Hannah Meier and Kathleen Nay

 

In this issue…

Hello Friedman!

by Danielle Krobath, Friedman Student Council

Welcome (and Welcome Back!) from Slow Food Tufts

by Simon Ye

Dig In to DINE this School Year!

by Bridget Carle and Casey Florea

Friedman Unofficial Running Club (FURC)

by Hannah Meier, Sara Scinto and Jessie Ellis

NewTrition Welcome Back 2017

by Kenny Westerman, Katherine Rancano, Jessie Ellis and Jennifer Huang

Making a Lasting Impact on Friedman

by Julie Kurtz, Friedman Justice League

 

Hello Friedman!

by Danielle Krobath, Friedman Student Council

A birds-eye view of the 2016 Welcome Back picnic. Photo: Friedman Student Council

A birds-eye view of the 2016 Welcome Back picnic. Photo: Friedman Student Council

Welcome to all the new and returning students. Having spent the summer here in Boston with a handful of other Friedman Jumbos, it is certainly a welcome sight to see the halls of Jaharis filled with people again. To kick off the semester, Student Council is busy planning the legendary “Welcome Back Picnic,” to take place near the docks on the Esplanade on Saturday September 16th at noon. We provide the food, you just bring yourself (and your friends, family, children, etc.)—we really hope to see you there!

Meeting other students across the various academic concentrations here at Friedman is one of the things that I enjoy most about serving as co-chair on Student Council. The chance to meet so many new people has been thanks in large part to the various events planned by the Social Chairs last year. Events range from the popular Friedman Fridays at Jacob Wirth’s (although if you go on Monday’s it is 45-cent wing night—yes, you can eat wings in nutrition school), to the trampoline park. The most memorable weekend for many Friedman students was the ski trip, when over 30 Friedman students trekked up to Sugarloaf Mountain in Maine for the weekend. A special shout out goes to FPAN doctoral student, Sara John, who broke her wrist learning to snowboard but still made it to Taco Night six hours later! Hannah Kitchel, External Social Chair, has begun putting together a list of events for the upcoming year, and encourages any suggestions you may have. The best way to reach Student Council is through email (friedmanstc@gmail.com) or to visit our brand-new Facebook page. After you click Like, send us a message.

Another pertinent role of the Friedman Student Council is to act as a liaison for the entire student body to the school administration. Historically this begins with a student feedback seminar each Fall. This year the feedback seminar is scheduled for Wednesday, October 25th at noon (look for more details via email and social media soon). In the Winter, the Student Life Representatives, Kelly Kundratic and Rachel Hoh, will take the ideas echoed at the feedback event and create a student life survey, the results of which are then disseminated in the Spring. Last year’s feedback events saw notable success, illustrated by the Jaharis Masters Student Lounge, where brand new desktop computers were installed this summer. If you are looking for more recreational or academic space, we encourage you to take advantage of the newly built Friedman Student Lounge on the second floor of Jaharis, in the smaller area outside of Jaharis 156 where there are new couches and desks, or in any the individual or group huddle rooms located on the 8th floor of 75 Kneeland Street.

Lastly, Friedman Student Council funds many of the unique student organizations formed here at the school. One student organization that Student Council was proud to contribute to was Let’s Talk. Let’s Talk was a month-long seminar, developed by four first-year students at our school, where Friedman students willingly engaged in bi-partisan dialogue with others at West Virginia University, in response to the political landscape that followed the presidential election.

Being involved in the activities hosted by Student Council and any of the other student groups at Friedman is a fun way to truly appreciate the grad school experience, without the stress of exams and deadlines. This sentiment is echoed by current Student Life Representative, Rachel Hoh: “We’re all extremely busy people. The wonderful thing about being a part of Student Council, and the greater Friedman Community, is coming to events, taking a deep breath, and spending a fun and TASTY time with my peers!”

When you want to take a break from your studies, get involved with the running of our school, and get to know your Friedman fellows, we sincerely hope Student Council can serve as a valued resource. All of us on Council look forward to seeing familiar faces and meeting new ones throughout the upcoming year!

Happy Fall!

Danielle Krobath
Friedman Student Council Co-Chair
Food Policy & Applied Nutrition Class of ‘18