5 Reasons the Whole30 is Not the Anti-Diet It Claims to Be

by Hannah Meier, RD, LDN

How does the Whole30 Diet hold up from a dietitian’s perspective? Hannah Meier breaks it down.

I’m calling it: 2017 is the year of the non-diet.

As a dietitian who ardently discourages short-term dieting, I was thrilled to read many articles posted around the new year with titles like “Things to Add, Not Take Away in 2017,” and “Why I’m Resolving Not to Change This Year.” Taking a step more powerful than simply abstaining from resolution season, influencers like these authors resolved to embrace the positive, stay present, and not encourage the cycle of self-loathing that the “losing weight” resolutions tend to result in year after year.

Right alongside these posts, though, was an overwhelming amount of press exonerating the Whole30—a 30-day food and beverage “clean eating” diet.

The founders of the Whole30, however, adamantly claim it is not a diet. Even though participants are advised to “cut out all the psychologically unhealthy, hormone-unbalancing, gut-disrupting, inflammatory food groups for a full 30 days” (including legumes, dairy, all grains, sugar, MSG, and additives like carrageenan), followers are encouraged to avoid the scale and focus on learning how food makes them feel rather than how much weight they gain or lose.

But our culture is still hungry for weight loss. The possibility of losing weight ahead of her sister’s wedding was “the deciding factor” for my friend Lucy (name changed for privacy), who read the entire Whole30 book cover to cover, and fought her “sugar dragon” for 30 days in adherence to the Whole30 protocol (only to eat M&M’s on day 31, she admits).

“Whole30 focuses on foods in their whole forms which is positive for people who are learning how to incorporate more unprocessed foods in their diet,” Allison Knott, registered dietitian and Friedman alum (N12) explains. “However, the elimination of certain groups of foods like beans/legumes and grains may have negative health implications if continued over the long-term.”

Diets like these trick consumers into thinking they are forming a healthier relationship with food. Though weight loss is de-emphasized, a trio of restriction, fear, and control are in the driver’s seat and could potentially steer dieters toward a downward, disordered-eating spiral.

I still think 2017 is the year of the non-diet, but before we get there we need to unmask the Whole30 and call it what it is: an unsustainable, unhealthy, fad diet.

1: It is focused on “can” and “cannot”

The Whole30 targets perfectly nutritious foods for most people (grains, beans and legumes, and dairy) as foods to avoid entirely, relegating them to the same level of value as boxed mac and cheese, frozen pizza, and Kool-Aid. And most bodies are perfectly capable of handling these foods. They provide a convenient, affordable, and satisfying means of getting calcium, vitamin D, potassium, phosphorus, and nutrient-dense protein. The Whole30 eliminates almost all the plant-based protein options for vegans and vegetarians. While the point of eliminating these foods, creators Hartwig and Hartwig explain, is to reduce inflammation and improve gut health, nowhere in the book or website do they provide scientific studies that show removing grains, beans and dairy does this for most people. But we’ll get to that later.

The Whole30 also instructs that participants not eat any added sugar or sweeteners (real or artificial), MSG (monosodium glutamate, a flavor enhancer that has been weakly linked to brain and nervous system disruption), or carrageenan (a thickener derived from seaweed and is plentiful in the world of nut milks and frozen desserts; conflicting evidence has both suggested and refuted the possibility that it is associated with cancer and inflammatory diseases), sulfites (like those in wine), or alcohol. Not even a lick, as they are very clear to explain, or you must start the entire 30-day journey from the beginning once more.

“I couldn’t go longer than 30 days without a hit of chocolate,” Lucy told me, explaining why she was dedicated to following the program exactly.

Why take issue with focusing on “good” and “bad,” “can” and “cannot” foods? As soon as a moral value is assigned, the potential for establishing a normal relationship to food and eating is disrupted. “The diet encourages following the restrictive pattern for a solid 30 days. That means if there is a single slip-up, as in you eat peanut butter (for example), then you must start over. I consider this to be a punishment which does not lend itself to developing a healthy relationship with food and may backfire, especially for individuals struggling with underlying disordered eating patterns,” Knott argues.

How will a person feel on day 31, adding brown rice alongside their salmon and spinach salad after having restricted it for a month? Likely not neutral. Restrictive dietary patterns tend to lead to overconsumption down the road, and it is not uncommon for people to fall back in to old habits, like my friend Lucy. “People often do several Whole30 repetitions to reinforce healthier eating habits,” she explained.

Knott relates the diet to other time-bound, trendy cleanses. “There’s little science to support the need for a “cleansing diet,” she says. “Unless there is a food intolerance, allergy, or other medical reason for eliminating food groups then it’s best to learn how to incorporate a balance of foods in the diet in a sustainable, individualized way.”

While no one is arguing that consuming less sugar, MSG and alcohol are unsound health goals, making the message one of hard-and-fast, black-and-white, “absolutely don’t go near or even think about touching that” is an unsustainable, unhealthy, and inflexible way to relate to food for a lifetime.

2: It requires a lot of brainpower

After eight years of existence, the Whole30 now comes with a pretty widespread social-media support system. There is plenty of research to back up social support in any major lifestyle change as a major key to success. Thanks to this, more people than ever before (like my friend Lucy, who participated alongside her engaged sister) can make it through the 30 days without “failing.”

But the Whole30 turns the concept of moderation and balance on its head. Perfection is necessary and preparation is key. Having an endless supply of chopped vegetables, stocks for soups, meat, and eggs by the pound and meals planned and prepared for the week, if not longer, is pretty much required if you don’t want to make a mistake and start over. The Whole30 discourages between-meal snacking, (why?) and cutting out sugar, grains, and dairy eliminates many grab-and-go emergency options that come in handy on busy days. So, dieters better be ready when hunger hits.

Should the average Joe looking to improve his nutrition need to scour the internet for “compliant” recipes and plan every meal of every day in advance? While the Whole30 may help those unfamiliar with cooking wholesome, unprocessed meals at home jumpstart a healthy habit, learning about cooking, especially for beginners, should be flexible. It doesn’t have to come with a rule book. In fact, I think that’s inviting entirely too much brain power that could be used in so many other unique and fulfilling ways to be spent thinking, worrying, and obsessing about food. Food is important, but it is only one facet of wellness. The Whole30 seems to brush aside the intractable and significant influence of stress in favor of a “perfect” diet, which may or may not be nutritionally adequate, anyway.

The language used by Whole30 creators to rationalize the rigidity of the diet could make anyone feel like a chastised puppy in the corner. “It’s not hard,” they say, and then proceed to compare its difficulty to losing a child or a parent. Okay, sure, compared to a major life stressor, altering one’s diet is a walk in the park. But changing habits is hard work that requires mental energy every single day. Eating, and choosing what to eat, is a constant battle for many people and it doesn’t have to be. Life is hard enough without diet rules. The last thing anyone needs is to transform a natural and fulfilling component of it (read: food) into a mental war zone with contrived rules and harsh consequences.

3: It is elitist

When was the last time you overheard a stranger complain about healthy eating being expensive? Most likely, the protester was envisioning a diet akin to the Whole30. Grass-fed beef, free-range chicken, clarified butter, organic produce…no dry staples like beans, rice or peanut butter. Healthy eating does not exist on a pedestal. It does not have to be expensive, but it certainly can be depending on where you choose to (or can) shop. Let’s set a few things straight: You don’t need grass-fed gelatin powder in your smoothies to be healthy. You don’t need organic coconut oil to be healthy. You don’t need exotic fruits and free-range eggs to be healthy. Maybe these foods mean more than just nutrition, signifying important changes to be made within our food system. But it terms of nutrition, sometimes the best a person can do for himself and his family is buy conventional produce, whole grains in bulk, and Perdue chicken breast on sale because otherwise they would be running to the drive thru or microwaving a packet of ramen noodles for dinner. A diet like the Whole30, which emphasizes foods of the “highest quality,” does nothing more than shame and isolate those who can’t sustain the standard it imposes, further cementing their belief that healthy eating is unattainable.

4: It is socially isolating

Imagine with me: I am participating in the Whole30 and doing great for the first week eating fully compliant meals. Then comes the weekend, and “oh no” it’s a football weekend and all I want to do is relax with my friends like I love to do. For me, that typically involves a beer or two, shared appetizers (even some carrots and celery!) and lots of laughs. The Whole30 creators would likely laugh in my face and tell me to suck it up for my own good and just munch on the veggies and maybe some meatballs. (“But are those grass-fed and did you use jarred sauce to make them? I bet there’s a gram of sugar hiding in there somewhere.”)

But it is just a month—certainly anyone can abstain from these type of events for a mere 30 days (remember, “it’s not hard”)—but then what? Do you just return to your normal patterns? Or do you, more likely, go back to them feeling so cheated from a month of restraint that you drink and eat so much more than you might have if you’d maintained a sense of moderation?

Of course, there are people comfortable with declining the food-centric aspect of social life, for whom turning down a glass of wine with cheese in favor of seltzer and crudités is no big deal. And perhaps our social events have become a bit too food centric, anyway. Either way, using food rules to isolate one’s self from friends and family sounds an awful lot like the pathway to an eating disorder, and the sense of deprivation most people likely feel in these situations can snowball into chronic stress that overshadows any short-term, nutrition-related “win.”

Although, maybe we should get all our friends to drink seltzer water and eat crudités at football games.

5: It is not scientifically sound

Most of The Whole30’s success has come from word of mouth, stories, and endorsements from those who successfully made it through the program and felt “better” afterwards. The website, dismayingly, does not house a single citation or study referenced in creation of the diet.

It’s important to note that the Whole30 did not exist 20 years ago. The Whole30 is not a pattern of eating that is replicated in any society on earth, and it doesn’t seem to be based off any research suggesting that it is indeed a superior choice. At the end of the day, this is a business, created by Sports Nutritionists (a credential anyone can get by taking an online test, regardless of one’s background in nutrition—which neither of them has) part of the multi-billion-dollar diet industry. Pinpointing three major food groups as causing inflammation and hormonal imbalance is quite an extreme statement to make without any research to back it up.

What does the science actually show? Knott, who counsels clients in her Tennessee-based private practice reminds us that, “consuming a plant-based diet, including grains and beans/legumes, is known to contribute to a lower risk for chronic disease like heart disease, cancer, and diabetes. Grains and beans/legumes are a source of fiber, protein, and B vitamins such as folate. They’re also a source of phytochemicals which may play a role in cancer prevention.”

The Whole30 proposes eliminating grains because they contain phytates, plant chemicals that reduce the absorbability of nutrients like magnesium and zinc in our bodies. While it’s true that both grains and legumes contain phytates, so do certain nuts and some vegetables allowed on the diet, like almonds. It is possible to reduce the amount of phytates in an eaten food by soaking, sprouting, or fermenting grains and legumes, but research from within the last 20 years suggests that phytates may actually play a key role as antioxidants. In a diverse and balanced diet, phytates in foods like grains and legumes do not present a major micronutrient threat. Further, new findings from Tufts scientists provide more evidence that whole grains in particular improve immune and inflammatory markers related to the microbiome.

Legumes in the Whole30 are eliminated because some of their carbohydrates aren’t as well-digested and absorbed in the small intestine. Some people are highly sensitive to these types of carbohydrates, and may experience severe digestive irritation like excessive gas, bloating, constipation, etc. Strategies such as the FODMAP approach are used with these folks under professional supervision to ensure they continue to get high-quality, well-tolerated fiber in their diets, and only eliminate those foods which cause distress. For others, elimination of these types of carbohydrates is unsound. Undigested fibers like those in legumes are also known as prebiotics, and help to feed the healthy bacteria in our gut. Eliminating this beneficial food group to improve gut health goes directly against the growing base of scientific evidence surrounding the microbiota.

Dairy, for those without an allergy or intolerance, has been shown to provide many benefits when incorporated into a balanced and varied diet, including weight stabilization and blood sugar control. The diet also fails to recognize the important health benefits associated with fermented dairy products like yogurt.

In terms of the diet’s long-term sustainability, Knott adds, “There’s plenty of research to support that restrictive diets fail. Many who adopt this way of eating will likely lose weight only to see it return after the diet ends.”

Let’s not forget its few redeeming qualities

For everything wrong with the Whole30, there are a few aspects of the diet that should stick. The concept of getting more in touch with food beyond a label, reducing added sugars, and alcohol is a good one and something that everyone should be encouraged to do. Focusing on cooking more from scratch, relying less on processed foods, and learning about how food influences your mood and energy levels are habits everyone should work to incorporate into a healthy life.

Knott agrees, adding, “I do like that the diet emphasizes the importance of not weighing yourself. We know that weight is a minor piece to the puzzle and other metrics are more appropriate for measuring health such as fitness, lean muscle mass, and biometric screenings.”

Improving the nutritional quality of your diet should not eliminate whole food groups like dairy, grains, and legumes. It should not have a time stamp on its end date, and rather, should be a lifelong journey focusing on flexibility, moderation, and balance. Lower your intake of processed foods, sugars, and alcohol and increase the variety of whole foods. Et voilà! A healthy diet that won’t yell at you for screwing up.

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Thanks to Allison Knott MS, RDN, LDN for contributing expertise. Knott is a private practice dietitian and owner of ANEWtrition, LLC based in Tennessee. She graduated from the Nutrition Communications program at Friedman in 2012.

 

Hannah Meier is a second-year, part-time Nutrition Interventions, Communication & Behavior Change student and registered dietitian interested in learning more about non-diet approaches to wellness. She aspires to make proper nutrition a simple, accessible and fulfilling part of life for people in all walks of life. You can find her on Instagram documenting food, fitness and fun @abalancepaceRD, as well as on her (budding) blog of the same title: http://www.abalancedpace.wordpress.com

Timing of your Meals–Does it Matter?

by Yifan Xia

How would you feel if you were told to not have dinner for the rest of your life? Skipping dinner every day might sound shocking to most of us, but it was once a very common practice in ancient China in the Han Dynasty. In fact, even today Buddhism and Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) promote this practice as a healthier choice than eating three meals per day. But does this practice have roots in science? Of course, controversy exists around this topic, but one thing that we can be certain of today is that the timing of our meals can have a much greater impact on our health than we originally thought.

Researchers investigating the circadian system (internal biological clock) have started looking at the effects of mealtime on our health. Surprisingly, preliminary evidence seems to support the claims of Buddhism and TCM, indicating that eating meals earlier in the day might help promote weight loss and reduce the risk of chronic disease.

What are circadian rhythms and the circadian system?

Circadian rhythms are changes in the body that follow a roughly 24-hour cycle in response to external cues such as light and darkness. Our circadian system, or internal biological clock, drives circadian rhythms and prepares us to function according to a 24-hour daily cycle, both physically and mentally.

Why do they matter to our health?

Our internal biological clock is involved in almost every aspect of our daily lives: it influences our sleep-and-wake cycle, determines when we feel most energetic or calm, and when we want to eat.

These days people don’t always rely on their biological clocks to tell them when to eat, and there are many distractions in the environment that can influence mealtime. We typically think how many calories we eat—and what we eat—are the major contributors to our weight and health, but researchers have found that eating at inappropriate times can disrupt the internal biological clock, harm metabolism, and increase the risk of obesity and chronic disease.

What does the research say?

Although currently the body of research evidence for this area is relatively small, there are several human studies worth highlighting. One randomized, open-label, parallel-arm study, conducted by Jakubowicz, D., et al and published in 2013, compared effects of two isocaloric weight loss diets on 93 obese/overweight women with metabolic syndrome. After 12 weeks, the group with higher caloric intake during breakfast showed greater weight loss and waist circumference reduction, as well as significantly greater decrease in fasting glucose and insulin level, than the group with higher caloric intake during dinner. Another study published in the same year with 420 participants noted that a 20-week weight-loss treatment was significantly more effective for early lunch eaters than late lunch eaters. In 2015, a randomized, cross-over trial, conducted in 32 women and published in International Journal of Obesity, showed that late eating pattern resulted in a significant decrease in pre-meal resting-energy expenditure, lower pre-meal utilization of carbohydrates, and decreased glucose tolerance, confirming the differential effects of meal timing on metabolic health. However, few studies were identified reporting negative findings, probably due to the fact that this is an emerging field and more research is needed to establish a solid relationship.

 So when should we eat? Is there a perfect mealtime schedule for everyone?

“There are so many factors that influence which meal schedules may be suitable for an individual (including biological and environmental) that I cannot give a universal recommendation,” says Gregory Potter, a PhD candidate in the Leeds Institute for Genetics, Health and Therapeutics (LIGHT) laboratory at the University of Leeds in the United Kingdom and lead author on the lab’s recent paper reviewing evidence of nutrition and the circadian systems, published in The British Journal of Nutrition in 2016. Potter also comments that regular mealtime seems to be more important than sticking to the same schedule as everyone else: “There is evidence that consistent meal patterns are likely to be superior to variable ones and, with everything else kept constant, it does appear that consuming a higher proportion of daily energy intake earlier in the waking day may lead to a lower energy balance and therefore body mass.”

Aleix Ribas-Latre, a PhD candidate at the Center for Metabolic and Degenerative Diseases at the University of Texas Health Science Center and lead author on another review paper investigating the interdependence of nutrient metabolism and the circadian systems, published in Molecular Metabolism in 2016, also agrees: “To find the appropriate meal time has to be something totally personalized, although [it] should not present [too] much difference.” Aleix especially noted that people who are born with a tendency to rise late, eat late, and go to bed late (“night owls” versus “early birds”) are more likely to be at risk for metabolic disease.

Do we have to eat three meals a day?

How many meals do you usually have? In fact, how much food makes a meal and how much is a snack? There is no universal definition, which makes these difficult questions to answer.

“To maintain a healthy attitude towards food, I think it is important to avoid being too rigid with eating habits … I do think consistency is important as more variable eating patterns may have adverse effects on metabolism,” says Potter. “Although there is evidence that time-of-day-restricted feeding (where food availability is restricted to but a few hours each day) has many beneficial effects on health in other animals such as mice, it is as yet unclear if this is true in humans. I’d also add that periodic fasting (going for one 24 hour period each week without energy containing foods and drinks) can confer health benefits for many individuals,” Potter comments.

[See Hannah Meier’s recent article on intermittent fasting for more.]

Based on their research, Ribais-Latre and his lab have a different opinion. “We should eat something every 3-4 hours (without counting 8 hours at night). Many people complain about that but then consume a huge percentage of calories during lunch or even worse at night, because they are very hungry. Eating a healthy snack prevents us [from] eating too [many] calories at once.” He suggests what he considers a healthier mealtime schedule:

–          6:00 am  Breakfast (30% total calories)

–          9:30 am  Healthy snack (10%)

–          1:00 pm  Lunch (35%)

–          4:30 pm  Healthy snack (10%)

–          8:00 pm  Dinner (15%)

What if you are a shift worker or your work requires you to travel across time zones a lot? Ribais-Latre’s advice is “not to impair more their lifestyle… at least it would be great if they are able to do exercise, eat healthy, sleep a good amount of hours.”

What does Traditional Chinese Medicine say?

There are historical reasons behind the no-dinner practice in ancient China in the Han Dynasty. First, food was not always available. Second, electricity hadn’t been invented, so people usually rested after sunset and they didn’t need much energy at what we now consider “dinner time.”

However, there are also health reasons behind this practice. In TCM theory, our internal clock has an intimate relationship with our organs. Each organ has its “time” for optimal performance, and we can reap many health benefits by following this clock. For example, TCM considers 1:00 am – 3:00 am the time of “Liver”. The theory says that is when the body should be in deep sleep so that the liver can help to rid toxins from our body and make fresh blood. Disruption at this time, such as staying up until 2:00 am, might affect the liver’s ability to dispel toxins, leading to many health problems, according to the theory.

Many Western researchers do not seem to be familiar with the TCM theory. When asked about the practice of skipping dinner, Potter comments, “I think that skipping dinner can be a perfectly healthy practice in some circumstances; in others, however, it may be ill advised if, for example, the individual subsequently has difficulty achieving consolidated sleep.”

On the flip side, Ribais-Latre says that “skipping a meal is not good at all. We should not eat more calories than those we need to [live], and in addition, the quality of these calories should be high… If you can split those calories [to] 5 times a day instead of three, I think this is healthier.”

Even though there is no universal agreement on mealtime, the tradition of “skipping dinner” did come back into style several years ago in China as a healthier way of losing weight, and was quite popular among Chinese college women. Yan, a sophomore from Shanghai and a friend of mine, said that she tried the method for six months but is now back to the three-meal pattern. “The first couple of days were tough, but after that, it was much easier and I felt my body was cleaner and lighter… I did lose weight, but that’s not the main goal anymore… I got up early every day feeling energetic. Maybe it’s because I only ate some fruits in the afternoon, I usually felt sleepy early and went to bed early, which made it easier to get up early the next day with enough sleep… I’m eating three meals now, but only small portions at dinner, and I think I will continue this practice for my health.”

So what’s the take-away?

Mealtime does seem to matter. But exactly how, why, and what we can do to improve our health remains a mystery. Researchers are now looking into the concept of “chrono-nutritional therapy,” or using mealtime planning to help people with obesity or other chronic diseases. When we resolve this mystery, the question of “When do you eat?” will not just be small talk, but perhaps a key to better health.

Yifan Xia is a second-year student studying Nutrition Communication and Behavior Change. She loves reading, traveling, street dancing, trying out new restaurants with friends in Boston, and watching Japanese animations.

 

 

Fall Flavors and Balanced Bites: Easy, Tasty, and Flexible Recipes for your Thanksgiving Repertoire

by Hannah Meier, RD, LDN

 For many, Thanksgiving is a time to take a step back and enjoy the little things–not least of which are family, friends, and food. But Thanksgiving also falls at a high time of stress for many students (and professors alike). Take advantage of the nostalgia that this season brings, and embrace your life as it is right now–how cool is it that you GET to be stressed out by your finals at the only nutrition school of its kind in the country? Okay…maybe that’s a stretch, but I know you will at least enjoy these recipes as simple and creative ways to squeeze in some Holiday cheer. And because I love finding tasty ways to enhance the nutritional value of any dish (without, of course, compromising taste!), all of these recipes are those I’ve developed or modified from their original versions to not only provide positive Holiday vibes, but also powerful nutritional moxie.

With the dawn of the 11th month of the year comes Thanksgiving. (Really, one could argue that the feast-filled festivities kick off with the first bite of pumpkin spice whatever, which this year happened to be August 29th when Dunkin Donuts debuted its sweetly spicy treats.) If you listen closely, you might be able to hear American foodies across the country .

Thanksgiving in America has long been associated with a bountiful table of rich and delicious food, prepared with care and shared among close friends and family. As graduate students in Boston, often far from home, harnessing anything reminiscent of warm thanksgiving dinners of years past can bring some peace to the hectic pace of school and work life.

But of course, as students with limited budgets, thinly stretched time, and perhaps a particular dietary preference or two (I see AND appreciate you, vegans!), it can seem like preparing a traditional Thanksgiving feast often isn’t in the cards. Think again! Get inspired with the following recipes that require just a few seasonal and nutritious ingredients, everyday kitchen tools, and easy preparation methods and savor the season as a thrifty, well-nourished omnivore or herbivore. Rest assured that the seasonal ingredients in these recipes provide meaningful nutritional benefits and come together in balanced combinations of nutrient-dense carbohydrates, cardio-protective fats, and lean proteins. Most importantly, they are absolutely delicious and worthy of being shared with your favorite people.

Appetizers & Finger Foods

Lox and Cracker Bites

Makes about 24 “Bites”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A play on the classic cream cheese, capers, and lox combination, these savory snacks can be pulled together in no time. Compared to more traditional cheese and sausage on crackers, the smoked salmon here offers anti-inflammatory fats and is less of a saturated fat bomb for a similar amount of protein. Look for whole grain crackers to round out the dish with filling fiber.

Ingredients

  • One 4-oz package of smoked salmon, sliced into thin strips
  • Plain strained (think Greek or Icelandic) yogurt—I like the consistency of Siggi’s in this recipe
  • Capers
  • Whole grain crackers (I like Mary’s Gone Crackers Rye)
  • Fresh dill (optional)
  • Cracked black pepper (optional)

Instructions

  1. Lay out about 24 crackers (you may need less or more depending on the type of cracker you use).
  2. Spread about 1 tablespoon of yogurt on each cracker. Top the crackers with a few capers, one or two slices of smoked salmon, and a pinch of fresh dill (optional).

Sprinkle black pepper over the crackers and serve.

 

Tahini Stuffed Dates (vegan)

Makes 25 dates

Photo Sourced via Pinterest (baconveggie.blogspot.ca)

Photo Sourced via Pinterest (baconveggie.blogspot.ca)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A sweet-and-savory combination, stuffed dates are another great finger-food option to bring to whatever Thanksgiving celebration you find yourself attending this season. Super simple to prepare, the dates pack their sweetness into a portable, fiber-full package that is a perfect complement to the tangy tahini filling and crunchy pistachio topping. Made from sesame seeds, the tahini brings a satisfying dose of unsaturated fats and protein that helps to balance out the sugary dates.

Ingredients

  • 25 Medjool dates, pitted
  • ½ cup of tahini
  • 25 shelled pistachios for topping

Instructions

  1. If not already pitted, remove the pit from 25 dates and lay on flat surface.
  2. Peel open or slice dates down the middle, forming a “boat” for filling.
  3. Stuff each date with 1 teaspoon of tahini and top with one whole, shelled pistachio.
  4. Enjoy!

 

Side Dishes

Cauliflower and Celery Root Mash (vegan)

Inspired by Gourmande in the Kitchen

Makes 4-6 servings

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

There is nothing wrong with potatoes, but why not try bringing something unique to the table this year? Celery root, also known as celeriac and knob celery, is in peak season during October and November. Though it is not the most handsome of vegetables, it can be eaten raw and tastes like a refreshing cross between celery and fresh parsley. When cooked, its flavor mellows to an almost nutty flavor. The combination of cauliflower and celery root in this mash brings a creamy alternative to potatoes in a dish with far less concentrated starchy carbohydrates per serving.

Ingredients

  • 1 medium celery root, peeled and cut into ½ inch cubes
  • 1 small head (about 16 ounces) cauliflower, cut into small florets
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • Pepper to taste

Instructions

  1. Steam the celery root and cauliflower in a microwavable steamer or in a steamer basket over boiling water.
  2. Transfer the cooked celery root and cauliflower to a tall blender or food processor (you may need to work in batches). Add oil and salt and blend/process until smooth. Add 1-2 tablespoons of steaming liquid to loosen the puree if needed.
  3. Season with additional salt and pepper to taste.

 

Main Course

Roasted Turkey

Servings vary depending on size of bird

Adapted from Food Network Magazine

Photo Credit: http://www.bhg.com

Photo Credit: http://www.bhg.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Can you get more traditional than a roasted turkey at Thanksgiving? Probably not. Though most Thanksgiving feasts are not famous for their stellar health profile, placing oven-roasted turkey at the center of the dinner table is actually a nutritionally sound tradition. According to the USDA Nutrient Database, one 3 ounce serving of light meat turkey (without the skin) contains 125 calories, 2 grams of fat, and 26 grams of protein (plain meat of course does not provide any dietary carbohydrates but that’s before you smother it with cranberry sauce or gravy). Dark meat turkey gets a bad rap, but actually only contains 3 more grams of fat per serving with slightly less protein and about 25 more calories. Dark meat tends to contain a higher concentration of vitamins B-6, B-12, niacin, choline, selenium, and zinc, though the light meat is also a good source. Compared to other animal meats, roasted turkey is generally a lean choice that is low in saturated fat (animal-based saturated fats seem to consistently have the worst effect on cardiovascular disease markers) and a good source of easily digested protein. In order to get the most out of your turkey dish and avoid post-feast “meat sweats,” try to keep your portion to about a size of a deck of cards, especially if you’re filling your plate with other protein-rich dishes.

Ingredients

  • A 10- to 12-pound turkey
  • Salt and pepper (or salt-free seasoning such as Mrs. Dash)
  • Onions, carrots, and apples, all chopped into large bite-size pieces
  • Fresh herbs like sage, rosemary, and thyme (per personal preference)
  • Olive oil

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 325°F .
  2. If not already removed, pull neck, liver, and giblets out of cavity. Save giblets for gravy if desired.
  3. Dry turkey with paper towels, then season inside and out with salt and pepper. Try using salt-free seasoning like Mrs. Dash to reduce sodium content for sensitive individuals.
  4. Fill turkey with chopped vegetables and apples, as well as fresh herbs of choice.
  5. Place breast-side up (legs on the bottom) in a roasting pan and brush with olive oil. Tent with foil and roast for 2 hours (add an extra 15 minutes per pound for larger birds).
  6. Remove foil, baste with more oil and turn up oven to 425 degrees. Roast for another hour or so until the meat at the thigh registers 165 degrees Fahrenheit for at least 15 seconds.

 

Cranberry, Lentil and Wild Rice Stuffed Acorn Squash (vegan)

Makes 4 Stuffed Squash Halves

Photo Credit: http://www.lentils.ca

Photo Credit: http://www.lentils.ca

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stuffing acorn squashes is an easy way to make it look like you can get fancy in the kitchen (but look at you, you can!) This time of year, acorn squash is plentiful at the grocery store and market, and is often on sale. If you can’t find or don’t like acorn squash, you can use a kabocha or small butternut squash instead. Winter squash, with its deep orange and yellow color, is bursting with phytochemicals, and when roasted takes on a caramelized flavor that makes it easy to forget how richly fibrous the flesh is. Did you know you can eat the squash skin? Just be sure to wash it well before cooking!

Wild rice, actually a seed not a grain, joins forces with lentils to provide a complete amino acid profile and round out the entrée as one that is entirely satisfying. Dried cranberries balance out the texture of each bite and provide irresistible jewels of tart sweetness. Enjoy this plant-based acorn squash dish as a vegan entrée or on the side of any traditional Turkey Day feast.

Ingredients

  • ½ cup uncooked wild rice
  • ¼ cup dried green or brown lentils
  • 2 cups vegetable broth or water
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 medium onion, diced
  • 1 garlic clove, minced
  • ½ cup dried cranberries (unsweetened, if you can find them)
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Spices (optional): ½ teaspoon rubbed sage and  ½ teaspoon dried thyme

  • 2 medium acorn squashes, cut in half and seeds removed.

Instructions

  1. In a medium saucepan, large skillet, or rice cooker, combine rice, lentils, and vegetable broth or water. If cooking in skillet or saucepan, bring liquid to a boil. Cover and reduce heat to low and simmer until rice and lentils are cooked, about 50 minutes. If cooking in rice cooker, use brown rice setting and let it do its thing.
  2. While the rice and lentils cook, preheat the oven to 400°F. Cover baking sheet with aluminum foil, lightly coat foil with oil or non-stick spray, and place squash halves cut side down. Bake until tender, about 30-35 minutes.
  3. Coat the bottom of a large skillet with olive oil and cook onion over medium-low heat. Add sage and thyme if using and cook, stirring occasionally, until onion softens and just begins to caramelize, about 15 minutes. Add garlic and cook one minute more.
  4. Add wild rice and lentil mixture to skillet. Add cranberries, and raise heat to medium-high. Cook 1-2 minutes, until mixture is heated through. Remove from heat and season with salt and pepper.
  5. To serve, scoop wild rice, lentil, and cranberry mixture into each squash half and enjoy!

Hannah Meier is a second-semester Nutrition Interventions, Communications and Behavior Change student and not-so-closet foodie. She loves to come up with better-for-your-body substitutions to traditional recipes that don’t sacrifice flavor or appeal. This year, she is thankful for a supportive and trusting family, and beautiful fall weather in New England.

 

Book Review: The Dorito Effect–The Surprising New Truth About Food and Flavor By Mark Schatzker

By Hannah Meier

Grocery store shelves are teeming with products that cater to every sense of flavor. New flavor combinations seem to appear out of thin air every day. Even meat and produce sections increasingly offer pre-seasoned and flavor-enhanced options. What happened to real flavor, and what does all of this have to do with the obesity epidemic? Mark Schatzker, a New York Times food journalist, hypothesizes the connection is stronger than cayenne pepper.

PDorito Effect pictureublished in 2015 and riding the wave of other big name titles in food journalism (The Omnivore’s Dilemma, Food Politics, and Soda Politics, to name a few), The Dorito Effect takes a similar investigational look at the food industry, with author Mark Schatzker aiming to reveal just how much we, as consumers, don’t know about what we’re eating. In The Dorito Effect, Schatzker introduces the current state of emergency regarding obesity by detailing, in quite intimate (and condescending) detail, the despair a woman named Jean Nidtech felt about her weight and her relationship with food that led her to found what is now Weight Watchers. I’m not sure how he knew Nidtech had “visions of jelly beans […] dancing in her head,” but the picture he paints is one arguing that the biggest problem with obesity is an addiction to, or an obsession with, junk food.

Despite this sweeping generalization, Schatzker does illuminate the discrepancy between Americans’ obsession with fad diets and diet foods alongside obesity’s continued rise in prevalence. He notes that we have flip-flopped between villains du jour for decades (is it the salt or the sugar that’s slowly killing you today?). We invent reformulated food products to champion this “food danger,” but have yet to turn the dial on the burden of obesity. Through Schatzker’s reasoning, something in our food environment has certainly changed, but we have taken too reductionist of an approach in addressing it. Food is complicated, he aptly admits. As “we keep mistaking the mechanism of obesity for the cause” (eating too many calories), we dig ourselves deeper into a hole filled with a surplus of nutrient-poor, flavor enhanced, unsatisfying and addicting junk food.

Schatzker summarizes what is common knowledge for many in the Friedman community—our agricultural system, by primarily emphasizing production capacity and ignoring taste, has vastly reduced the nutritional quality and flavor of plant and animal products. The nutrients and plant “secondary compounds”—bioactives as you may know them—are really what constitutes flavor in food in its natural state. He argues that our senses were developed to recognize the various flavors and aromas inherent to particular foods, and that we are “wired” to want foods that fulfill particular physiological needs within our bodies.

Citing a Utah State Professor’s experiments with goats, who developed aversions to plants with toxins and learned to prefer flavors associated with nutrients in which they were deficient, Schatzker concludes that if humans interacted with food in the same way—choosing to eat particular types of plants based on the nutritional demands of the body—obesity would not be the epidemic it is today. We have confused ourselves, he claims, by ridding our food supply of plant secondary compounds, thereby stripping it of flavor and handicapping our innate ability to recognize key qualities and self-regulate our nutrition. Instead, according to Schatzker, we never get full from manufactured, flavor-added products because they don’t truly fulfill their purpose. We keep eating and eating and have ultimately found ourselves in the deep pit of an obesity epidemic.

The idea that our bodies innately respond to our food environment is a convincing hypothesis that has some scientific backing. For one thing, it’s long been accepted that humans have this same kind of post-ingestive feedback for high-calorie foods because we evolved to seek out foods with the most energy density. Schaztker dug up a study conducted by a pediatrician in the 1920’s, who fostered 15 babies and let them grow up eating whatever they wanted from a list of 34 foods (including potatoes, corn, barley, carrots, peaches and brains… among others) and found that these babies were excellent at adopting balanced diets and choosing foods to meet their needs as they changed over time. One baby with rickets, Schaztker recounts, drank cod liver oil in varying amounts over the course of his illness until he was better.

In a brief search of the literature, I failed to find similar studies to back this up. But this may be due to the increased ethical considerations of involving humans in experimental studies over a lack of effect.

Being realistic, the type of food exposure created by the dedicated pediatrician in the 20’s isn’t what most people in the 21st century experience. We live within cultures valuing food norms and are subjected to unbridled media influence. Schatzker would argue that the relationship between nutrients and flavors has been adulterated by the twin forces of the dwindling nutritional quality of our food supply and the abundance of synthetic flavor enhancements we now associate more with meeting emotional needs than biological ones.

Schatzker goes on to spend an inordinate amount of time oscillating between revering the flavor industry for its chemical ingenious and condemning it for perpetuating the disconnect between nutrition and flavor. His sometimes unrefined writing style blames both the overweight individual (often identifying her as “fat” so-and-so) and the food system at large for failing to reverse obesity. Though he does a good job of addressing the complexity of the association between food, flavor and nutrition, he stops short of identifying other key issues that cannot be overlooked when confronting obesity. Financial instability, social inequality, food policy and availability, and cultural norms among the larger issues, with emotional and psychological influences also playing a huge role in what food ends up on individual and family tables.

Schatzker’s grand resolution at the end of the book is to entrust food technology with the task of bringing us back to foods with flavors true to their nutrient content. He believes that if food technology can harness genetic modification to improve yield and durability, surely it can modify genes that enhance nutrient quality. While certainly a good idea, will genetically modifying food to be more nutritious reverse obesity on its own? Hardly.

It will be up to experts like us to dig deeper, and tackle each level of the complex food system with the Friedman understanding that everything is connected, everything is important.

Hannah Meier is a first-year, second-semester NUTCOM student, registered dietitian, and food lover enamored with the complexity of the food system and the way individuals interact with it. Reading The Dorito Effect had no impact on her liberal use of herbs and spices in the kitchen.