Ackee: Jamaica’s Irresistible Delicacy

by Christine Sinclair

Ever heard of Jamaica? Yes? Ever heard of Bob Marley and Usain Bolt? Yes? Ever heard of ackee? No? Well, just like Jamaica and our international stars, ackee is a star in its own right. You don’t quite know Jamaica until you know ackee. So let me introduce you. Sit back, because you are in for a treat! Ackee has a rich history dating back to the slave trade. It has a delicious flavor, and a unique texture that you will want to add to your cooking repertoire. And the recipe below is Friedman approved, having debuted the recipe below to a group of students with rave reviews.

Ackee is a fruit that grows in clusters of three in a pod on large evergreen trees in tropical climates, namely on the Caribbean island of Jamaica and in other parts of the world, including West African countries, Haiti, and parts of South America. The outer shell of this fist-sized fruit is bright red, with hues of orange and yellow. It has a tough outer skin that protects its delicate inside. As ackee matures and ripens, it naturally opens up to expose its edible contents. This unique and bountiful fruit grows throughout the island and, in fact, is Jamaica’s national fruit and a main ingredient in the national dish, ackee & saltfish.

Ackee has been Jamaica’s national fruit for centuries, having made its way to the island during the 18th century, carried over on slave ships departing West Africa. Its name is derived from the West African Akye fufo and its scientific name, Blighia sapidawas, was coined by a man named Captain William Bligh, and has since become a staple food in the Jamaican diet. The yellow arils are edible, while all other parts of the fruit, including the seeds are discarded.

Ackee fruit by Rik Schuiling

Ackee fruit by Rik Schuiling

Ackee not only has an interesting history, but a unique and potentially dangerous toxic property. Ackee goes through stages of maturation and ripening. During these different stages, ackee has varying levels of a water soluble toxin called Hypoglycin A and B. These toxins produce a symptom called Jamaican Vomiting Syndrome (JVS) aka Toxic Hypoglycemic Syndrome (low blood sugar as low as 3 mg/dL), which can cause severe vomiting, abdominal pain, coma and death. But, wait! Before you run off dismissing this delicate treat, let me explain how ackee can be enjoyed with no toxic effects at all.

In unripe ackee, the concentration of Hypoglycin A is about 1000 parts per million (ppm). As the fruit matures, in addition to its exposure to sunlight, Hypoglycin A is drastically reduced to 0.1 ppm in the mature fruit. Ingestion of immature ackee (a.k.a. ackee not left to properly ripen and naturally open) produces the toxic effect in humans.

Ackee found in the United States is precooked and canned, and has gone through extensive processing checks by the USDA to ensure safe consumption. And these checks seem to work: There have been no known cases of JVS in the United States from canned, imported ackee due to these regulations.

Photo: Ackee stages of maturity

Photo: “Tastes Like Home,” Ackee stages of maturity

What are the health benefits of ackee?

Although there hasn’t been a lot of research on ackee—partly because it isn’t grown in the United States—what little literature we do have suggests that ackee provides many health benefits. People in Jamaica will eat ackee cooked or uncooked. The uncooked version is said to serve as a strong diuretic, helping move the bowels and keep them in good shape. While the uncooked version cannot be found in the United States, the cooked form can be found canned in international markets. And don’t worry, only mature ackee is canned for your eating pleasure!

Ackee in both forms is rich in the monounsaturated fatty acids, oleic acid (55.4%), palmitic acid (25.57%), and stearic acid (12.59%), and is low in calories (about 151 calories per 100g can of ackee). Ackee is also rich in many vitamins and minerals, according to the West Indian Medical Journal.

How is ackee prepared?

When ackee is cooked with different meats and spices, it takes on the flavors of what you pair it with—without losing its own unique taste. Many find it difficult to describe the actual taste of ackee, saying it has the consistency of avocado with a rich buttery flavor. After interviewing a number of people, the verdict is still out. The best way to know? Try it for yourself!

At Ackee Bamboo Restaurant in Los Angeles, CA, owners Marlene and Delroy Beckford prepare this staple dish for customers unfamiliar with ackee’s delicious taste and powerful history. Hoping to give them a true and authentic experience of Jamaica, they give out samples to convince the novice that they are in for a treat. As Marlene said, “If you say you have had ackee [and saltfish] you have been to the island.”

Ackee and Jamaican Culture

Ackee’s uniqueness, beautiful range of colors and its authentic and delicious taste describes the very essence of Jamaica. Ackee is Jamaica! Rooted in a deep history of the slave trade, revolution and liberation, ackee is so much more than a delicious meal. To try and put into words the meaning that this national fruit has is close to impossible. But, if you would like a bite size experience of a rich and powerful history, the next time you spot ackee in your local market or pass by a Jamaican restaurant, be sure to pick up a can or stop in and ask for a plate of ackee and saltfish with dumplings, green banana, yellow yam and callaloo!

Picture: Ackee & saltfish with green banana, yellow yam, boiled dumplings and greens

Picture: “Pinterest,” Ackee & saltfish with green banana, yellow yam, boiled
dumplings and greens

Ackee Recipe

Ingredients – 4 people

1/2 lb saltfish (dried, salted codfish)*

12 fresh ackees or 1 (drained) can of tinned ackee

1 medium onion

1/2 tsp black pepper

3 tbsp of butter or cooking oil

1/2 a hot chili pepper (ideally Scotch Bonnet)

1 bell pepper (red, green or both)

1 chopped tomato

1 sprig fresh thyme or 1 tsp dried thyme

Optional ingredients: 2 cloves of garlic 4 scallion (green onion)

*Eliminate the saltfish to make this recipe vegan

Preparation

  • Cover the saltfish in cold water and let it soak overnight (minimum 8 hours) changing the water several times (this removes most of the salt)
  • Bring a pan of cold water to boil and gently simmer the fish for 20 minutes (until tender)
  • Chop the onion, bell pepper, chili pepper and tomato
  • Remove the fish from the water and allow to it cool
  • Remove all bones and skin then flake the flesh of the fish

Cooking

  • Melt the butter or add oil in a frying pan and stir fry the onion, black pepper, bell pepper, chili and thyme for about 3 minutes
  • Add the tomatoes and flaked fish and stir-fry for another 6 minutes
  • Add the ackee and cook until hot throughout and tender. Stir gently to avoid breaking-up the ackee

Serve with yam, green banana, or fried dumplings

ackee4

Christine Sinclair is a second-semester NICBC student in the dual MS-DPD program whose family is from the beautiful island of Jamaica. She is an avid health enthusiast who loves challenging activities such as boxing, cross-fit, and distance running. If Christine isn’t cooking, she is eating, or talking about food. 

10 Hearty Soups to Make in Less than an Hour

by Katelyn Castro

Fresh almost always tastes better than the canned version, especially when it comes to soup. Having a few hearty soup recipes on hand that you can rely on can be a lifesaver when canned soup just doesn’t cut it. They say soup warms the soul, right?

Snow. Wind. Frigid temperatures. Winters like these usually leave me craving a warm bowl of soup. It’s one of those comfort foods that never really gets old. The problem I have, though, is choosing what soup to eat. 

Canned soup is always easy. Just crack open the can, pour it into a bowl, zap it in the microwave, and violà! You’re done. But, in the end, I’m usually not satisfied with canned soup. Either the meat isn’t fresh, the broth is way too salty, or it just doesn’t fill me up.

Homemade soup, on the other hand, almost never disappoints me. Making soup from scratch can seem tedious though, especially when it involves a slow cooker, a food processor, hours of your time, and 20+ ingredients. Finding simple yet tasty soup recipes can be hard, which is why I put together this delightful list. These soups made the cut because they:

  • Take less than 50 minutes to make
  • Require 15 ingredients or less
  • Are filling, with enough protein and fiber
  • Are delicious, with a variety of flavors and cuisines (a.k.a. not just your typical chicken noodle soup)
  1. TURKEY CHILI

This turkey chili is perfectly spiced and hearty with a mix of ground turkey, kidney beans and corn—you won’t even miss the beef! And it’s a quick recipe to make for game day eats.

  1. TUSCAN KALE AND BEAN SOUP

If you’re in the mood for something Italian, try this savory Tuscan soup. The blend of vegetables, beans, and herbs brings me back to when I was eating my way through Italy. Add a sprinkle of Parmesan cheese on top and you’re good to go!

  1. HAM AND POTATO SOUP

Now, if you’re more of a meat-and-potatoes kind of person, this creamy ham and potato soup is for just you. Bonus: It’s gluten-free and dairy-free for those with allergies or intolerances.

  1. TOMATO LENTIL SOUP

Most lentil soups that I’ve tried kind of just taste blahh. It seems like there is always something missing! This lentil soup is different, though. With tomatoes, peppers, chilis, and a mix of spices, it has the right boost of flavor.

Source: Wholefully

Source: Wholefully

  1. ITALIAN WEDDING SOUP WITH QUINOA

This one’s a twist on your traditional Italian wedding soup, but it’s equally delicious. Plus, with all the meatballs, quinoa, and veggies, it’s loaded with protein and fiber to keep you full.

Source: Love & Zest

Source: Love & Zest

  1. SPINACH ARTICHOKE PESTO TORTELLINI SOUP

If you’re looking for something a little more carb-y, then try this tortellini soup. It’s like spinach artichoke dip, but better. With just 9 ingredients and 15 minutes of cooking time, it’s also quick and easy to make.

  1. CREAMY CHICKEN NOODLE SOUP

Campbell’s chicken noodle soup is great and all, but when you use fresh chicken, noodles, and veggies to make soup from scratch it’s hard to go back to the canned version. Plus, the creaminess of this soup makes it soup-er satisfying.

Source: Well Plated

Source: Well Plated

  1. GINGER TOFU AND VEGETABLE SOUP

Looking for a soup with more of a savory, umami flavor? With a blend of ginger, garlic, soy sauce, and bok choy, this Asian noodle soup is the perfect choice. To all the tofu skeptics out there: Give it a try!

  1. CHICKEN AND RICE FAJITA SOUP

Like the turkey chili, this soup definitely has a kick to it. Luckily the rice and beans are there to help you handle the spiciness a little better. Bonus: You only need one pot and 25 minutes for cooking time.

  1. CHICKPEA FARRO TOMATO SOUP

Farro is one of those whole grains that tends to stay under the radar. If you’ve never tried it before, now is your chance!  Cooked similarly to rice, farro’s nutty flavor makes it a tasty alternative to more common whole grains—especially in this soup.

Katelyn Castro is a second-year student in the DI/MS Nutrition Program at the Friedman School. She is a food science geek who loves experimenting with simple, flavorful recipes in the kitchen and forcing her friends and family to try her healthy concoctions.

Fall Flavors and Balanced Bites: Easy, Tasty, and Flexible Recipes for your Thanksgiving Repertoire

by Hannah Meier, RD, LDN

 For many, Thanksgiving is a time to take a step back and enjoy the little things–not least of which are family, friends, and food. But Thanksgiving also falls at a high time of stress for many students (and professors alike). Take advantage of the nostalgia that this season brings, and embrace your life as it is right now–how cool is it that you GET to be stressed out by your finals at the only nutrition school of its kind in the country? Okay…maybe that’s a stretch, but I know you will at least enjoy these recipes as simple and creative ways to squeeze in some Holiday cheer. And because I love finding tasty ways to enhance the nutritional value of any dish (without, of course, compromising taste!), all of these recipes are those I’ve developed or modified from their original versions to not only provide positive Holiday vibes, but also powerful nutritional moxie.

With the dawn of the 11th month of the year comes Thanksgiving. (Really, one could argue that the feast-filled festivities kick off with the first bite of pumpkin spice whatever, which this year happened to be August 29th when Dunkin Donuts debuted its sweetly spicy treats.) If you listen closely, you might be able to hear American foodies across the country .

Thanksgiving in America has long been associated with a bountiful table of rich and delicious food, prepared with care and shared among close friends and family. As graduate students in Boston, often far from home, harnessing anything reminiscent of warm thanksgiving dinners of years past can bring some peace to the hectic pace of school and work life.

But of course, as students with limited budgets, thinly stretched time, and perhaps a particular dietary preference or two (I see AND appreciate you, vegans!), it can seem like preparing a traditional Thanksgiving feast often isn’t in the cards. Think again! Get inspired with the following recipes that require just a few seasonal and nutritious ingredients, everyday kitchen tools, and easy preparation methods and savor the season as a thrifty, well-nourished omnivore or herbivore. Rest assured that the seasonal ingredients in these recipes provide meaningful nutritional benefits and come together in balanced combinations of nutrient-dense carbohydrates, cardio-protective fats, and lean proteins. Most importantly, they are absolutely delicious and worthy of being shared with your favorite people.

Appetizers & Finger Foods

Lox and Cracker Bites

Makes about 24 “Bites”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A play on the classic cream cheese, capers, and lox combination, these savory snacks can be pulled together in no time. Compared to more traditional cheese and sausage on crackers, the smoked salmon here offers anti-inflammatory fats and is less of a saturated fat bomb for a similar amount of protein. Look for whole grain crackers to round out the dish with filling fiber.

Ingredients

  • One 4-oz package of smoked salmon, sliced into thin strips
  • Plain strained (think Greek or Icelandic) yogurt—I like the consistency of Siggi’s in this recipe
  • Capers
  • Whole grain crackers (I like Mary’s Gone Crackers Rye)
  • Fresh dill (optional)
  • Cracked black pepper (optional)

Instructions

  1. Lay out about 24 crackers (you may need less or more depending on the type of cracker you use).
  2. Spread about 1 tablespoon of yogurt on each cracker. Top the crackers with a few capers, one or two slices of smoked salmon, and a pinch of fresh dill (optional).

Sprinkle black pepper over the crackers and serve.

 

Tahini Stuffed Dates (vegan)

Makes 25 dates

Photo Sourced via Pinterest (baconveggie.blogspot.ca)

Photo Sourced via Pinterest (baconveggie.blogspot.ca)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A sweet-and-savory combination, stuffed dates are another great finger-food option to bring to whatever Thanksgiving celebration you find yourself attending this season. Super simple to prepare, the dates pack their sweetness into a portable, fiber-full package that is a perfect complement to the tangy tahini filling and crunchy pistachio topping. Made from sesame seeds, the tahini brings a satisfying dose of unsaturated fats and protein that helps to balance out the sugary dates.

Ingredients

  • 25 Medjool dates, pitted
  • ½ cup of tahini
  • 25 shelled pistachios for topping

Instructions

  1. If not already pitted, remove the pit from 25 dates and lay on flat surface.
  2. Peel open or slice dates down the middle, forming a “boat” for filling.
  3. Stuff each date with 1 teaspoon of tahini and top with one whole, shelled pistachio.
  4. Enjoy!

 

Side Dishes

Cauliflower and Celery Root Mash (vegan)

Inspired by Gourmande in the Kitchen

Makes 4-6 servings

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

There is nothing wrong with potatoes, but why not try bringing something unique to the table this year? Celery root, also known as celeriac and knob celery, is in peak season during October and November. Though it is not the most handsome of vegetables, it can be eaten raw and tastes like a refreshing cross between celery and fresh parsley. When cooked, its flavor mellows to an almost nutty flavor. The combination of cauliflower and celery root in this mash brings a creamy alternative to potatoes in a dish with far less concentrated starchy carbohydrates per serving.

Ingredients

  • 1 medium celery root, peeled and cut into ½ inch cubes
  • 1 small head (about 16 ounces) cauliflower, cut into small florets
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • Pepper to taste

Instructions

  1. Steam the celery root and cauliflower in a microwavable steamer or in a steamer basket over boiling water.
  2. Transfer the cooked celery root and cauliflower to a tall blender or food processor (you may need to work in batches). Add oil and salt and blend/process until smooth. Add 1-2 tablespoons of steaming liquid to loosen the puree if needed.
  3. Season with additional salt and pepper to taste.

 

Main Course

Roasted Turkey

Servings vary depending on size of bird

Adapted from Food Network Magazine

Photo Credit: http://www.bhg.com

Photo Credit: http://www.bhg.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Can you get more traditional than a roasted turkey at Thanksgiving? Probably not. Though most Thanksgiving feasts are not famous for their stellar health profile, placing oven-roasted turkey at the center of the dinner table is actually a nutritionally sound tradition. According to the USDA Nutrient Database, one 3 ounce serving of light meat turkey (without the skin) contains 125 calories, 2 grams of fat, and 26 grams of protein (plain meat of course does not provide any dietary carbohydrates but that’s before you smother it with cranberry sauce or gravy). Dark meat turkey gets a bad rap, but actually only contains 3 more grams of fat per serving with slightly less protein and about 25 more calories. Dark meat tends to contain a higher concentration of vitamins B-6, B-12, niacin, choline, selenium, and zinc, though the light meat is also a good source. Compared to other animal meats, roasted turkey is generally a lean choice that is low in saturated fat (animal-based saturated fats seem to consistently have the worst effect on cardiovascular disease markers) and a good source of easily digested protein. In order to get the most out of your turkey dish and avoid post-feast “meat sweats,” try to keep your portion to about a size of a deck of cards, especially if you’re filling your plate with other protein-rich dishes.

Ingredients

  • A 10- to 12-pound turkey
  • Salt and pepper (or salt-free seasoning such as Mrs. Dash)
  • Onions, carrots, and apples, all chopped into large bite-size pieces
  • Fresh herbs like sage, rosemary, and thyme (per personal preference)
  • Olive oil

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 325°F .
  2. If not already removed, pull neck, liver, and giblets out of cavity. Save giblets for gravy if desired.
  3. Dry turkey with paper towels, then season inside and out with salt and pepper. Try using salt-free seasoning like Mrs. Dash to reduce sodium content for sensitive individuals.
  4. Fill turkey with chopped vegetables and apples, as well as fresh herbs of choice.
  5. Place breast-side up (legs on the bottom) in a roasting pan and brush with olive oil. Tent with foil and roast for 2 hours (add an extra 15 minutes per pound for larger birds).
  6. Remove foil, baste with more oil and turn up oven to 425 degrees. Roast for another hour or so until the meat at the thigh registers 165 degrees Fahrenheit for at least 15 seconds.

 

Cranberry, Lentil and Wild Rice Stuffed Acorn Squash (vegan)

Makes 4 Stuffed Squash Halves

Photo Credit: http://www.lentils.ca

Photo Credit: http://www.lentils.ca

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stuffing acorn squashes is an easy way to make it look like you can get fancy in the kitchen (but look at you, you can!) This time of year, acorn squash is plentiful at the grocery store and market, and is often on sale. If you can’t find or don’t like acorn squash, you can use a kabocha or small butternut squash instead. Winter squash, with its deep orange and yellow color, is bursting with phytochemicals, and when roasted takes on a caramelized flavor that makes it easy to forget how richly fibrous the flesh is. Did you know you can eat the squash skin? Just be sure to wash it well before cooking!

Wild rice, actually a seed not a grain, joins forces with lentils to provide a complete amino acid profile and round out the entrée as one that is entirely satisfying. Dried cranberries balance out the texture of each bite and provide irresistible jewels of tart sweetness. Enjoy this plant-based acorn squash dish as a vegan entrée or on the side of any traditional Turkey Day feast.

Ingredients

  • ½ cup uncooked wild rice
  • ¼ cup dried green or brown lentils
  • 2 cups vegetable broth or water
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 medium onion, diced
  • 1 garlic clove, minced
  • ½ cup dried cranberries (unsweetened, if you can find them)
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Spices (optional): ½ teaspoon rubbed sage and  ½ teaspoon dried thyme

  • 2 medium acorn squashes, cut in half and seeds removed.

Instructions

  1. In a medium saucepan, large skillet, or rice cooker, combine rice, lentils, and vegetable broth or water. If cooking in skillet or saucepan, bring liquid to a boil. Cover and reduce heat to low and simmer until rice and lentils are cooked, about 50 minutes. If cooking in rice cooker, use brown rice setting and let it do its thing.
  2. While the rice and lentils cook, preheat the oven to 400°F. Cover baking sheet with aluminum foil, lightly coat foil with oil or non-stick spray, and place squash halves cut side down. Bake until tender, about 30-35 minutes.
  3. Coat the bottom of a large skillet with olive oil and cook onion over medium-low heat. Add sage and thyme if using and cook, stirring occasionally, until onion softens and just begins to caramelize, about 15 minutes. Add garlic and cook one minute more.
  4. Add wild rice and lentil mixture to skillet. Add cranberries, and raise heat to medium-high. Cook 1-2 minutes, until mixture is heated through. Remove from heat and season with salt and pepper.
  5. To serve, scoop wild rice, lentil, and cranberry mixture into each squash half and enjoy!

Hannah Meier is a second-semester Nutrition Interventions, Communications and Behavior Change student and not-so-closet foodie. She loves to come up with better-for-your-body substitutions to traditional recipes that don’t sacrifice flavor or appeal. This year, she is thankful for a supportive and trusting family, and beautiful fall weather in New England.

 

Five Veggies to Try This Fall

by Katelyn Castro

With the days getting shorter and the weather getting colder, you may be missing the summer barbeques with crisp corn on the cob, grilled zucchini, and fresh tomato-mozzarella-basil salads. But, don’t fill your grocery cart with canned or frozen veggies just yet! Fall vegetables can be just as satisfying, especially when you have some delicious recipes to try.

“Eat your veggies!” We’ve probably all been told this before, whether it was from our doctor, our parents, or some health nut on a juice cleanse. Despite the known health benefits of vegetables, 87% of Americans do not meet the recommended daily serving of vegetables (2 ½ cups), according to a national report published by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention.

Vegetables are expensive. They don’t taste good. I don’t know how to prepare them… As a nutrition student, these are the most common answers I hear when asking patients, friends, and family their reason for not eating vegetables. As a hummus-and-veggie lover, I am determined to change vegetables’ bad reputation! Believe it or not, vegetables can be affordable and they can taste pretty darn delicious if you know when to buy them and how to prepare them.

With a variety of fresh and local produce available at farmers’ markets and grocery stores during the fall season, now is the perfect time to start eating more veggies. Seasonal vegetables are not only more tasty and nutrient-rich since they are picked at peak harvest time, but they are also usually less expensive than out-of-season produce.

Here are five seasonal vegetables to try this fall, along with some cooking preparation tips. Whether you like your veggies soft or crunchy, savory or sweet, the following recipes offer something for everyone’s palate.

1- Cauliflower

Due to its mild taste, cauliflower is extremely versatile, making it an easy vegetable to incorporate into almost any dish ranging from pizza and casseroles to rice and pasta dishes. As a cruciferous vegetable, cauliflower adds bulk and fiber to meals without significantly altering flavor. Try steaming cauliflower, then mash it with potatoes, use it to make a pizza crust, or bake it with macaroni and cheese. One cup of steamed cauliflower provides three grams of fiber and 92% of the daily value of Vitamin C in only 29 calories!

Recipes to try:

Photos from recipes above

Photos from recipes above

2- Winter Squash

Although named for its ability to stay hardy throughout the winter months, winter squash is actually harvested during the fall. Pumpkin may be the most popular type of winter squash, but acorn, butternut, and spaghetti squash are other fall varieties that can be just as flavorful. The sweet flavor and dense texture make winter squash a great addition to soups, salads, lasagnas, and even desserts. Don’t let the tough exterior or hefty size of winter squash intimidate you! Most varieties can be easily sliced and baked, requiring little effort to prepare. One cup of cooked and cubed winter squash is a great source of Vitamin A and Vitamin C. However, to really reap the benefits of winter squash, don’t forget to eat the seeds! Winter squash seeds are one of the top sources of magnesium and zinc, which are both important nutrients for metabolism and immunity. One ounce of roasted seeds provides 35% of the daily value of magnesium and 20% of the daily value of zinc.

Recipes to try:

Photos from recipes above

Photos from recipes above

3- Carrots

Yes, they may be available all year round, but carrots are at their best in the fall. As a hardy vegetable, carrots are a convenient snack to pack and eat on-the-go with hummus or a yogurt-ranch dip. Adding sliced or shredded carrots into a salad or wrap are other easy ways to add more veggies to your diet. If cooking carrots, try roasting them with some healthy oil, like olive oil, or steaming them with a few drops of water. By steaming or roasting, you’ll preserve the water-soluble vitamins and minerals in carrots, which can be lost if cooked in a lot of water. One cup of raw carrots (or ½ cup steamed or roasted) has more than 100% of the daily value for Vitamin A, an important nutrient for eye and skin health.

Recipes to try:

Photos from recipes above

Photos from recipes above

4- Cabbage

Cabbage is another vegetable that seems to be in grocery stores all year round. However, cabbage is truly at its peak in the fall, with red cabbage, green cabbage, and bok choy most commonly available. In addition to being a staple in coleslaw, cabbage is also a great veggie to add to green salads, sandwiches, and wraps for a light and crunchy flavor. For a softer texture, try roasting or sautéing cabbage as part of a savory or sweet side dish. Although the nutritional value varies depending on the type of cabbage, all varieties are a great source of fiber and many vitamins and minerals. One cup of chopped green cabbage has 85% of the daily value of Vitamin K, an important nutrient for blood clotting and bone health. In contrast, one cup of chopped red cabbage provides a great source of Vitamin A and Vitamin C. Red cabbage is also rich in antioxidants called anthocyanins, which give cabbage its deep purple color.

Recipes to try:

Photos from recipes above

Photos from recipes above

5- Rutabaga

This list would not be complete without one oddball! Rutabaga may not be the prettiest of vegetables with its bulbous shape and hairy roots, but this root vegetable deserves a chance. Rutabaga’s mild flavor, slightly sweeter than turnip, makes it a great substitution or addition to potato dishes. As a versatile vegetable, rutabaga can be mashed like potatoes, puréed into soups, or roasted with herbs alongside other root vegetables. One cup of cooked rutabaga provides three grams of fiber, 16% of the daily value of potassium, and 53% of the daily value of Vitamin C.

Recipes to try:

Photos from recipes above

Photos from recipes above

 

Looking for other veggies to try during this fall season? Check out this chart for a list of produce with their typical harvest months in specific towns and cities within Massachusetts. To find a farmers’ market near you, use this map to search for open markets based on location and preferred type of produce.

Katelyn Castro is a second-year student in the DI/MS Nutrition Program at the Friedman School. She is a food science geek who loves experimenting with different seasonal veggies in the kitchen and forcing her friends and family to try her healthy concoctions.

How to Make Your Own Almond Milk

by Julia Sementelli

Spoiler: It’s so much better than the stuff you’ll find in the grocery store

Almond milk is one of the more popular food trends of the past ten years. It is a great option for individuals who are lactose-intolerant, vegan, or choose not to consume dairy for religious reasons. Moreover, it is an alternative to soy milk. While the jury is still out on soy’s high estrogen levels, we do know that it is best to consume it in moderation. For a food like milk that we consume multiple times per day—in our coffee, granola, or as an addition to a smoothie—it may be best to select a less controversial non-dairy substitute.

Almond milk has risen to the top of the “milk” hierarchy, but commercial almond milk has an undeserved health halo. Nearly every brand of almond milk contains fillers, thickeners, preservatives and added sweetener. Like most processed foods, these additives preserve almond milk cosmetically (it naturally separates) and extend its shelf life (the fats from the almond cause it to spoil rather quickly). But is the trade-off worth it?  The solution to limiting your intake of chemical and preservative-laden almond milk is: make your own!

Homemade almond milk is a game-changer. It is creamier than almond milk from a carton and it actually tastes like almonds. While making all of our food from scratch is a Sisyphean task, homemade almond milk is so easy and so much more wholesome than processed almond milk, that you have no excuse not to make your own.

 

Processed with VSCO with c1 preset

Photo By Julia Sementelli

 

Recipe: Homemade almond milk

Ingredients:

1 cup raw almonds (preferably organic)

4 cups filtered water (plus more to soak the almonds)

1 teaspoon vanilla extract (optional)

Directions:

  1. Add almonds to a jar, then fill the rest of the jar with water to cover the almonds
  2. Refrigerate for 24 hours
  3. After 24 hours, drain and rinse the almonds
  4. Add almonds, 4 cups filtered water, and vanilla (if using) to a powerful blender
  5. Blitz for 1-2 minutes until almonds are pureed (make sure to keep your hand on the lid)
  6. Place nut bag or cheese cloth over a large bowl and pour almond milk into the bag or cheesecloth to strain
  7. Squeeze the bag/cheesecloth until all of the milk has been extracted
  8. Transfer almond milk to glass jars or other container and refrigerate
  9. Almond milk will remain fresh for up to 3 days

Julia Sementelli is a second-year Nutrition Communication & Behavior Change student.  She is also a Registered Dietitian who is passionate about REAL FOOD.  When Julia is not studying, you can find her searching for the perfect lighting to photograph her breakfast for Instagram  (follow me @thejuliasementelli) and her blog (http://www.juliasementellinutrition.com/girlversesfood/).

Lemon Preserve: Lemons + Salt + Patience

By Jennifer Huang

Have you ever seen “patience” listed as a recipe ingredient? No? Well you’ll need it, as this simple recipe promises a unique and versatile flavor burst that is well worth the wait.

I have seen lemon preserves in Middle Eastern grocery stores before—usually as unappealing lemons floating in questionable liquid—and never gave them a second thought. Thankfully, my brother recently enlightened me on what lemon preserves are after he saw a recipe posted by our favorite Taiwanese food blogger, Karen Hsu.

Lemon preserves aren’t new to the scene: The earliest reference to this ingredient was in an Arab Mediterranean recipe from the 11th century, according to the Encyclopedia of Kitchen History. Today, you will find lemon preserves in many Moroccan and Middle Eastern cuisines.

So what’s the hype? Well, many recipe bloggers describe how the fermenting process brings the flavor and fragrance of lemon to an unimaginable level. Used in recipes for salad dressing, couscous, chicken and many other dishes, lemon preserve is a versatile ingredient sure to liven up any dish. Another beautiful thing about lemon preserve—it is simple to make and requires few ingredients. However, one of them, as Serious Eats has put it, is patience.

Here is the recipe translated and adapted from Karen Hsu’s blog:

Lemon Preserve

Duration: 15 minutes

Ingredients:

  • 12 lemons
  • 200 g salt (approximately ¾ cup)
  • 3-4 whole pieces of bay leaves (optional)
  • Some black pepper (optional)
  • Patience

Lemon Preserve Picture (1)

Steps:

  • Sterilize glass jars. (My brother and I boiled mason jars in water for 10 minutes.)
  • Cut six lemons into ¼ inches slices.
  • Layer salt and lemon slices in the jar. Put some salt into the jar first, then a lemon slice, then salt, etc.
  • After layering, crush the bay leaves and sprinkle both the bay leaves and black pepper into the jar (optional).
  • Squeeze juice from the other six lemons into the jar.
  • Seal the jar and put it in the refrigerator.
  • Wait for a month. (Yes. A month, but it will transform your life after that month.)

Disclaimer: I have used this recipe, but have not tasted it myself (it won’t be ready until September 14, and is currently fermenting in Houston). However, after reading a myriad of articles about lemon preserve, I think it is a promising addition to anyone’ shelf.

But… since my patience is wearing thin, I have found Moroccan restaurants in Somerville and Charleston that have lemon preserve dishes I am dying to try. Join me if you are interested, because I shall be going there, very soon.

Jennifer Huang is a first-year FPAN student. She worked as a dietitian in Houston and is interested in the economics and trade of food and food safety at the international level.

Acai Bowl Recipe

by Skylar Morelli

What is the hype with acai berries? Acai berries (pronounced ah-sigh-eeh) are indigenous to the Amazon and have become popular in America as a “superfood.” They are rich in omegas, antioxidants, fiber, polyphenols, and anthocyanins. The berries are dark purple and taste like a combination of red wine and chocolate. You can find these versatile berries in many forms such as juice, energy drinks, powders, capsules, cosmetics (seriously), and in delicious bowls! You can get acai bowls at most juice bars – if you’re willing to pay $10-$12 for one. You can also make your own with this quick, delicious, grad student budget-friendly recipe!

Ingredients

1 100-gram pack of frozen acai berry pulp

1 tbsp. almond butter

½ cup milk of choice

1 banana cut in half

A handful of your favorite berries

¼ cup granola (optional)

A pinch of coconut shreds (optional)

Prep time: 5-10 minutes

Total cost for ingredients: $20-25 (makes 4)

Instructions

In a blender, add frozen acai pack, almond butter, milk, half the banana, and half the berries. Blend until everything is mixed. If mixture is not fully blending, add another ¼ cup of milk. The consistency should be too thick for a straw, but perfect for eating with a spoon. Pour mixture into a bowl. Next add chopped banana and berries on top, and finish by sprinkling on granola and coconut. You can get creative with recipes and add your own fruits and toppings of choice! Enjoy!

acai

Background

Acai berries have been touted as a “superfood” for years. Unless you go to South America, you will likely find acai in many forms, but not the berries themselves. The berries go rancid within 24 hours of being picked due to their high fat content (in case you were wondering why you haven’t seen an actual acai berry in the US). They are nutrient dense; low in carbohydrates, sodium, and cholesterol; and are naturally sugar-free.

What the lay press says

The lay press loves to hype up the benefits of acai with claims ranging from cancer fighting, to anti-aging, to weight loss. While none of these claims have been proven, it is known that acai berries are rich in powerful nutrients like polyphenols, anthocyanins, and other antioxidants.

What the research says

Currently there is inconclusive evidence to support any health benefits of consuming acai. Numerous studies however, have observed potent antioxidant properties of acai berries in humans. An in vivo pilot study looked at effects of acai berries on metabolic biomarkers of 10 overweight adults (BMI between 25 and 30). Subjects drank 100 grams of acai pulp twice a day for a month. Compared to baseline, fasting glucose significantly decreased from 98.0 ± 10.1 mg/dl to 92.8 ± 10.9 mg/dl. Plasma fasting insulin also significantly decreased after one month. A 2015 research review suggests that acai berries can interfere with and inhibit metabolic pathways that lead to inflammation and oxidative stress – two risk factors for chronic disease.

Acai berries have sparked a lot of interest and a clear need for more research. Most studies have used rats and in vitro cell cultures, though researchers have recognized the need for more in vivo, human, trials. In the meantime, stay tuned to new research and enjoy this refreshing, antioxidant-rich, summer treat!

Skylar Morelli is a second-year NutComm Student. She believes the sunshine and ocean are the most potent forms of therapy.