Friedman Goes to FNCE

by Hannah Meier, Sharmin Sampat and Anabelle Harari

Every year in October, dietitians from across America gather together at a convention for three days of learning, networking, and eating. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics organizes the national event, The Food and Nutrition Conference and Expo (or FNCE® for short), bringing together registered dietitians (RDs), dietetic technicians, registered (DTRs), students, interns, researchers, physicians, policy makers and industry leaders to talk about current practices, care guidelines, controversies, innovation and entrepreneurship in nutrition. Three current students from Friedman, Hannah Meier, Anabelle Harari and Sharmin Sampat share their highlights.

October 21-24, 2017 marked the 100-year centennial anniversary of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics’ organized advocacy and support for the profession. Highlights include not only interesting educational sessions put together by seasoned experts (including Friedman’s own Dr. Tim Griffin in a talk about Sustainability and Dietary Guidelines), but booth after booth in the expo hall of health foods, supplements, schools and services relevant to the practices of nutrition professionals. Attendees of the conference and expo can network with brands, media, and fellow professionals at sponsored events or practice group receptions before and after each organized day within the program. Each day also features special events like culinary demonstrations, book signings, and poster presentations of research conducted by dietitians across the country.

Photo: Hannah Meier

More details of the event and program can be found on the conference website: eatrightfnce.org.

Hannah Meier

Why did you choose to go to FNCE this year?

I knew I wanted to attend FNCE in Chicago after attending my first conference when it was in Boston last year. I learned so much at the sessions and enjoyed getting to know the people behind some of the popular and up-and-coming food and nutrition brands at the expo. This year, I was fortunate to be able to attend the conference on behalf of the food company I work with, 88 Acres. Instead of hosting an expo booth, we organized a get-together with two other New England brands, DrinkMaple and Biena, and were able to network with dietitians and media contacts more personally.

What was your favorite Education Session?

My favorite education session was actually a career panel about pursuing “hot” career paths in nutrition. We learned from dietitians who forged their way into roles that may not have existed previously, and it was inspiring to hear from them about how to balance confidence and work ethic while ensuring that you still love your career at the end of the day. Dawn Jackson-Blatner, the RD for the Chicago Cubs and one of the panelists has also been featured in top media outlets and on the reality show My Diet is Better than Your Diet (which she won!).

What was your favorite new product at the Expo?

As funny and unglamorous as this seems, my favorite product was from Starkist: Pouches of tuna with rice and beans in hot sauce. Since working with student athletes at Tufts in Medford, I’ve learned the importance of convenience when it comes to managing nutrition with a busy schedule, and it’s my goal to recommend whole foods as much as possible as opposed to convenient snack bars and shakes (though these can be great in a pinch and certainly better than nothing). The packs of tuna with rice and beans combine a high-quality source of protein with fiber-rich grains for carbohydrates, and make an excellent, portable post-workout or game snack—or something to bring with you during a busy day of back-to-back classes. The packs even contain a portable fork that can be reused!

Favorite quote of Anabelle, overheard at FNCE

Did you find any new food and nutrition trends that surprised you?

The rise of plant-based foods was prevalent on the expo floor, though it didn’t necessarily surprise me. The breadth of options featuring plant proteins from hemp seeds to pea protein included ice cream, milks, chips, and cereals. It is clear that there is a demand for more plant-focused alternatives to animal products and food companies are responding in creative ways!

What was the most controversial topic you saw?

I attended an educational session about weight bias in healthcare settings and felt an immediate divergence among RD’s in the audience about defining and treating obesity. The presenters reflected on the importance of ensuring that we do not use shameful, dehumanizing or assumptive approaches to treating and preventing obesity on the policy level, but argued that we cannot focus only on prevention and leave out those who still struggle with obesity as a disease. During the question and answer segment at the end of the talk, one dietitian presented the idea that obesity might not need to be approached as a disease and rather as a descriptor of size, and that we turn our focus away from managing “weight” and more to managing health behaviors. I have been personally interested in learning more about weight-neutral approaches to nutrition and adopting an evidence-based Health at Every Size framework for practice, looking at metabolic indicators as opposed to BMI as primary outcomes for health. As encouraging as it was to see medical professionals talking about reducing weight bias in health care, the debate goes on about the best way to “treat”, reduce, and prevent obesity in the long-term, and whether or not it should really be considered a disease whatsoever.

How has your understanding of food and nutrition changed since going to FNCE?

I am encouraged, yet a little overwhelmed with the potential we have as nutrition professionals to not only shape the health trajectory of our nation, but of the globe. I appreciated the wide array of niche areas in which dietitians across the country choose to specialize, and am reminded that this is a field that can benefit from all types of thinkers, movers and shakers. I think we are at a time where collaboration is critical, and changes need to be made both with small, individual steps on the ground and with large steps on the level of policy via food industry collaboration.

Hannah is a second-year Nutrition Communication student and registered dietitian. This was her second FNCE, and her first that she attended on behalf of 88 Acres. She enjoyed networking with other professionals and ironically ended up craving a lot of fruits and vegetables at the end of the conference after sampling protein bar after protein bar in the expo.

 

Favorite quote of Sharmin, overheard at FNCE

Anabelle Harari

Why did you choose to go to FNCE this year?

I was really interested in learning about the latest nutrition research, meet fellow nutrition students from around the country, and network with some brands that I love.

What was your favorite Education Session?

My favorite education session was a toss-up between a talk on Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS) and navigating different career paths in nutrition. There were so many interesting and inspiring sessions, it was really difficult to choose which to attend! Luckily, all of the sessions were recorded and can be watched later.

What was your favorite new product at the Expo?

Love the new Triple Cream Chocolate Siggi’s yogurt and the Vital Protein Matcha Collagen that comes out in a few months. Both really delicious.

Did you find any new food and nutrition trends that surprised you?

There were a lot of bars, but that did not really surprise me. I saw a bunch of companies using sprouts, grains, and of course countless protein shakes.

What was the most controversial topic you saw?

Weight Stigma in Healthcare, Communities and Policy—this session challenged people to be careful with public health messaging around obesity, stigmatizing patients with obesity, and being considerate of the language we use as professionals.

How has your understanding of food and nutrition changed since going to FNCE?

I think there is a lot of exciting changes in biotech that will influence the food and nutrition profession. There were several DNA and microbiome testing companies at the Expo as well as a fascinating session on nutrigenomics. I think as the science advances, we’re seeing more personalized nutrition, people wanting to know very specific information, and also tailoring nutrition recommendations to each person based on their unique genetic information.

Anabelle is in her third year completing the MS-DPD program with a concentration in Nutrition Communications and Behavior Change. When she’s not in class, you can find her in the kitchen creating delicious and healthy recipes for her blog, Local Belle. Check her out on Instagram for inspiring recipes and nutrition tips: @localbelle 

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Favorite quote heard by Sharmin, originally attributed to Eleanor Roosevelt

Sharmin Sampat

Why did you choose to go to FNCE this year?

This was my first FNCE conference. I am glad and grateful I got a chance to attend as a student host volunteer, a position I had applied for early on. As a volunteer, I was stationed at the Silent Auction area and helped with registering items for the auction. It was a excellent opportunity to network and connect with people with various backgrounds in nutrition. I had heard a lot about FNCE during my internship at EatingWell Magazine and how amazing it is to attend the best annual event in the nutrition field. I also wanted to take the opportunity to go to the student internship fair and gain insights about the programs I plan to apply to for my Dietetic Internship next year.

What was your favorite Education Session?

My favorite session was Sport Supplement: Facts, Noise and Wishful-thinking. It talked about how the sport nutrition market accounts for $30 billion U.S. dollars and rising—but unfortunately, it’s a market backed with little scientific evidence. It also shed light on how athletes consume ineffective supplementation to improve their health/stamina. I was surprised to find out that 1 out of 10 supplements that are purchased over the internet contain substances that fail a drug test. The Speaker also briefly gave some cues for reducing risks associated with supplements. In addition, I noticed how social media was also a big part of the sessions at FNCE. As Anabelle noted, I too had a hard time deciding which sessions to attend.

What was your favorite new product at the Expo?

I thoroughly enjoyed the KIND fruit bites, which are bite-size snacks made of real fruit. They claim to have no juice, concentrate, or preservatives—just real fruit. I must admit I found them tasty and interesting.

Did you find any new food and nutrition trends that surprised you?

Though not surprising, I found a lot of focus on fiber, functional foods: foods that have positive effects on the body other than basic nutrition; like a company named Beneo introduced chicory root fibers, a digestible fiber, in their products to improve gut health. There were also sessions that focused on gut health and gut microbiota.

Favorite quote of Hannah, overheard at FNCE

What was the most controversial topic you saw?

I attended a session on agriculture and its links to healthy eating patterns. One topic that was discussed at length in this session was Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs). The speaker addressed how different countries have varying viewpoints on GMOs, which influences their policy making. I think GMO, in general, is a very controversial topic and as noted by the speaker, Dr. John Erdman, an emotional one too!

How has your understanding of food and nutrition changed since going to FNCE?

I think FNCE has been a insightful experience and made me realise how nutrition and its related fields can make such a great impact, not only on an individual but also on governments and countries. There is immense and extensive research in the field of nutrition that is taking place right now. It was overwhelming and inspiring at the same time, and it makes me grateful to be a part of this field.

Sharmin is a 2nd year student at Friedman School of Nutrition, majoring in Nutrition Interventions, Communications, and Behavior Change. She is also completing her coursework at Simmons College to become a Registered Dietitian.

 

 

 

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